Free Kindle Books: Read, and refine your appetite;

learn to live upon instruction ; feast your mind and mortifv your flesh ; read, and take your nourishment in at your eyes, shut up your mouth, and chew the cud of understanding. — Congreve.

the bookshelf banner colour

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through.

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

American Fairy Tales, Frank L. Baum

Reader Review: Baum, who lived between 1856 and 1919, collected thirteen tales in this volume. The stories are humorous. They seem to be new stories, not versions of fairy tales found in other cultures. The Box of Robbers is a good example. A young girl is left alone at home, goes up to her attic, finds an ancient chest, opens it, and discovers that it contains three Italian robbers. Her reactions to the robbers and theirs to her and to America are funny. They insist that they must continue their profession, so they go down stairs and bring up to the attic a lot of the girl’s parent’s possessions. After awhile, the girl finds a funny excuse to lure the robbers back into the chest. “The story should teach us,” Baum writes, “not to interfere in matters that do not concern us. For had Martha refrained from opening Uncle Walker’s mysterious chest she would not have been obliged to carry downstairs all the plunder the robbers had brought into the attic.”

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by W. H. Mallock- I have read none of them, but I am downloading one for reading later in the Philippines, since I cannot take more than a couple books with me.  Russel Kirk wrote of Mallock:

“How is one to sum up the work of W. H. Mallock, which fills twenty-seven volumes, exclusive of ephemerae? Mallock is remembered chiefly for one book, The New Republic, and that his first, composed while he still was at Oxford – “the most brilliant novel ever written by an undergraduate,” says Professor Tillotson, justly.[38] (It is also the most brilliant accomplishment in its genre, after Thomas Love Peacock; and perhaps it is equal to Peacock at his best.) But other books of Mallock’s are worth looking into still — his theological and philosophical studies, his didactic novels, his zealous volumes of political expostulation and social statistics, even his books of verse.” (more at Wikipedia)

Memoirs of Life and Literature by W. H. Mallock- a sort of autobiography.  It’s also free at Gutenberg.  Here’s an excerpt:

“One May morning in London, when I had just completed a fortnight of political speaking in Fifeshire, a friend of mine, Ernest Beckett (afterward the second Lord Grimthorpe), came in a state of obvious excitement to see me, and talk, so he said, about something of great importance. He had, it appeared, been spending some weeks in the south of France, and was full of a project the value of which had, so he said, been amply proved by experiment. To me at first sight it seemed no better than lunacy. I could not for some time even bring myself to consider it seriously. This project was to play a new system at Monte Carlo. It was a system founded on one which, devised by Henry Labouchere, had been–such was Beckett’s contention–greatly improved by himself, and he and a companion had been playing it with absolutely unbroken success. ”

Is Life Worth Living?- also available at Gutenberg. It’s a rebuttal of the school of thought then known as ‘positivism’ and a defense of the Catholic church.  He dedicates it to Ruskin.Here’s an excerpt:

“Great art is a speculum reflecting life as the keenest eyes have seen it. All its forms and imagery are of value only as this. Taken by themselves, ‘_the best in this kind are but shadows_.’ We have to ‘_piece out their imperfections, with our thoughts_;’ ‘_imagination has to amend them_,’ and ‘_it must be our imagination, not theirs_.'[23] In examining a work of art, then, we are examining life itself; or rather, in examining the interest which we take in a work of art, in examining the reasons why we think it beautiful, or great, or interesting, we are examining our own feelings as to the realities represented by it. And now remembering this, let us turn to certain of the world’s greatest works of art–I mean its dramas: for just as poetry is the most articulate of all the arts, so is the drama the most comprehensive form of poetry. In the drama we have the very thing we are now in want of. We have life as a whole–that complex aggregate of details, which forms, as it were, the mental landscape of existence, presented to us in a ‘_questionable shape_,’ at once concentrated and intensified. And it is no exaggeration to say that the reasons why men think life worth living, can be all found in the reasons why they think a great drama great.”

A Critical Examination of Socialism Here is an excerpt (from Gutenberg)

"CHAPTER III
THE ROOT ERROR OF THE MARXIAN THEORY.
ITS OMISSION OF DIRECTIVE ABILITY.
ABILITY AND LABOUR DEFINED
In approaching the opinions of another, from whom we are about to
differ, we gain much in clearness if at starting we can find some point
of agreement with him. In the case of Marx we can find this without
difficulty, for the first observation which our subject will naturally
suggest to us is an admission that, within limits, his theory of
production is true. Whatever may be the agencies which are required to
produce wealth, human effort is one of them; and into whatever kinds
this necessary agency may divide itself, one kind must always be labour,
in the sense in which Marx understood it--in other words, that use of
the hands and muscles by which the majority of mankind have always
gained their livelihood.

It is, moreover, easy to point out actual cases in which all the wealth
that is produced is produced by labour only. The simplest of such cases
are supplied us by the lowest savages, who manage, by their utmost
exertions, to provide themselves with the barest necessaries. Such
cases show that labour, wherever it exists, produces at least a minimum
of what men require; for if it were not so there would be no men to
labour. Such cases show also another thing. The most primitive races
possess rude implements of some kind, which any pair of hands can
fashion, just as any pair of hands can use them. These rude implements
are capital in its embryonic form; and so far as they go, they verify
the Marxian theory that capital is nothing but past labour crystallised.

But we need not, in order to see labour, past and present, operating and
producing in a practically unalloyed condition, go to savage or even
semi-civilised countries. The same thing may be seen among groups of
peasant proprietors, which still survive here and there in the remoter
parts of Europe. These men and their families, by their own unaided
labour, produce nearly everything which they eat and wear and use. Mill,
in his treatise on _Political Economy_, gives us an account of this
condition of things, as prevailing among the peasants in certain
districts of Germany. "They labour early and late," he says, quoting
from a German eulogist. "They plod on from day to day and from year to
year, the most untirable of human animals." The German writer admires
them as men who are their own masters. Mill holds them up as a shining
and instructive example of the magic effect of ownership in intensifying
human labour. In any case such men are examples of two things--of
labour operating as the sole productive agency, and also of such labour
self-intensified to its utmost pitch. And what does the labour of these
men produce? According to the authority from which Mill quotes, it
produces just enough to keep them above the level of actual want. Here,
then, we have an unexceptionable example of the wealth-producing power
of labour pure and simple; and if we imagine an entire nation of men
who, as their own masters, worked under liked conditions, we should have
an example of the same thing on a larger and more instructive scale. We
should have a whole nation which produced only just enough to keep it
above the level of actual bodily want."

 

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

A Dash for a Throne, adventure novel

Amazon Reader Review:

Shades of the PRISONER OF ZENDA, THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER, & THE MAD KING – another tale of royal impersonation replete with intrigue, villains, heroes, & derring-do. Anthony Hope’s THE PRISONER OF ZENDA was published in 1894. Marchmont’s novel in 1899. Marchmont wrote using the same theme but did not directly copy Hope’s work as Edgar Rice Burroughs did in THE MAD KING. Modern readers should be aware that this is a 19th century novel set in the 19th century. It has a slower pace – No car crashes, explosions, machine guns, etc. It is very well written with a believable plot and full of interesting intrigue, villainous plots, horseback chases & carriage crashes. This review is from the free Kindle edition released December 18, 2012.

Other titles by same author, so far as I can tell, all in a similar vein.

By Wit of a Woman

The Man Without a Memory

An Imperial Marriage

By Right of Sword

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by Emma Marshall- she wrote historical fiction and history books for children in the 1800s.  A reviewer at the time writes “MRS MARSHALL’S HISTORICAL STORIES Mrs Marshall’s stories based for the most part on the lives and times of eminent Englishmen and Englishwomen have been the means of awakening and cultivating a taste for history and literature throughout the English speaking world”- Canon AINGER

Penshurst Castle (published in 1893) A study of the domestic life of Sir Philip Sidney and of the manners of reign of Elizabeth

Under the Mendips, a tale: Review from an 1886 reviewer who is tartly disdainful, but so funny it makes me want to read the book :

“Although manslaughter, Socialism, and the Bristol riots of 1831 form the subject of Under the Mendips, it is not to be accused of sensational effects. It is throughout a gentle story in which strong events are much disguised by the feminine telling. Joyce Falconer is a good girl of a country breeding more distinctive than would be possible in our days but otherwise not differentiated from all the other excellent young heroines in early teens who wear cotton frocks and clustering curls and whom their excellent fathers call Sunshine, a sickly habit. But Joyce’s brother has the mark of his time, a certain Georgian flavour which is well given. So is the housewifeliness of the mother who washes her own china and silver and withstands the popular education movement fostered by Mrs Hannah More; so too is the sentimentality of the secondary heroine who sighs for a high born lover and writes poetry. How long past are the days in which the secondary heroines of life and fiction laid themselves open to mild satire by pursuits and humours of this kind. Of course Mrs Marshall is better in the passages of household manners than in the passages of movement. The wild maiden, Susan Priday, who is anxious about the spiritual condition of her father is not a very living character. In one scene when this father makes a desperate attack upon Joyce and Susan comes to the rescue the action is indeed not a little grotesque. The villain is felled by the hero and Susan seats herself on her father’s chest. In this position she sketches the family history, makes some observations on Mrs Hannah More’s reforms, gushes about a baby and releases the murderous Priday only after the lapse of four pages of literature. Mrs Marshall treats all the historical parts of her story instructively and her teaching is throughout religious and honest. If her mob is too readily appeased by the presentation of buns by the heroine and by her pious exhortations, the burning of Queen Square and the Mansion House is yet given, according to the record of the facts. The buns and the exhortations save the lives of Mrs Marshall’s favourite personages only.”

Bristol Bells, a Story of the Eighteenth Century

 

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guessing Games to Play

Place three books on the table, in a pile, each one projecting just a little beyond the others. Two people in the group have to be in on the ‘secret.’  One of those two goes out, and then any other person in the group points to any one of the three books. The absent guest is called back by the other person in the know, and points to the correct book.

There are two ways of doing this. One is by means of the words used in calling the child back. The signal for the top book is the word ” Ready!” for the second book the word “Come” and for the third or lowest book the words, “Come on,” are always used when calling the absent person back.

Another way is for to use handmovements.  Decide in advance how you  should know the correct book by watching the other person’s movements with her hands. If the top book is the correct one, she will, in a casual way, place her hand to her forehead. If the second book is the correct one, she places her finger on or beside her nose, and for the third or lowest book, she places her hand against her chin.

As soon as another guest thinks that he has discovered the secret, let him try to do it.

the-book-game-the-commonroom Still another book number game is to first place 9 books in a grid, 3X3, and again, two people must know the secret. One of the two people who know the trick leaves the room. Anybody else chooses a book.  The person is called back, and the one who knows the trick points to a book and asks “Is it is this one?”

We find it works best to lay the books out on the floor and use a pointer- like a broom stick or a yard stick. Or if you have a very small group, use 9 playing cards and a pencil for a pointer.

The trick is that you basically see the book as a map of the grid of nine books. If the chosen book (or playing card, if you haven’t 9 books) is the second book in the top row, you point to any book in the grid, but you *touch* it in the center  of the top edge.  After that, it doesn’t matter what you do or how you ask, you have already told the other person which book it is and it only remains for you to tap the correct book at any time and he will say yes.

If the chosen book is the center, the first time you ask ‘is it this one?’ you tap the book in the middle.  If it is the one in the bottom left, you tap the book in the bottom left corner.

Posted in Games | Tagged | Leave a comment

Free for Kindle: By reading…

…we enjoy the dead ; by conversation, the living ; and by contemplation, ourselves. Reading enriches the memory ; conversation polishes the wit ; and contemplation improves the” judgment. Of these, reading is the most important, as it furnishes both the others. — Colton.

the bookshelf banner colour

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through.

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by Alfred Edward Wooley Mason: He was born in 1865. He was educated at Dulwich College before being sent up to Oxford University. Once his formal education was completed, Mason went on to become an actor. He began his writing career with historical fiction and then moved into the arena of politics, becoming a Liberal Member of Parliament for Coventry in 1906. But his love of writing carried on and Mason developed his style to incorporate detective fiction, introducing one of the earliest fictional detectives, Inspector Hanaud, the Gallic counterpart to Sherlock Holmes. His detective fiction contains material clues and spontaneity. Throughout the course of his life he produced over thirty titles. A E W Mason died in 1948. (from Amazon)

Clementina

The Four Feathers (it used to be the practice to give a white feather, representing cowardice, to men who did not volunteer for the military during a war.

Reader Review: A.E.W. Mason’s classic story of love lost and courage found is over a hundred years old, but its themes are timeless: love, friendship, and courage, along with the human desire to make right the wrongs of the past.
Harry Feversham is a young officer in the British army whose greatest fear is to be seen a coward, and disgrace those whom he loves. On the night he finds out that he is to be sent to war in Egypt, he resigns his commission in order to avoid any possibility that his fears may be realized. In response to Feversham’s act, three of his friends send him three white feathers as a symbol that in their eyes, the decision makes him a coward. When Feversham’s fiancee, Ethne Eustace, finds out about Feversham’s act and the three feathers, she gives Harry a fourth feather, and casts him out of her life. A broken man, Feversham quitely resolves to redeem himself by proving his bravery to each of the four, forcing each to recant their accusation of cowardice and take back the feather that each person gave.
What evolves is a grand tale of adventure, as the lives of Feversham and his closest friends move along through the next few years. Ethne moves on with her life, while not entirely forgetting Feversham, nor forgiving herself for her harsh treatment of him. Harry’s best friend, Jack Durrance, is blinded in the Sudan and returns to England to marry Ethne, but never forgets about Feversham, and wonders what happened to his friend. As details of Feversham’s deeds begin to emerge, both Ethne and Durrance begin to understand Feversham’s character; they realize their true feelings about him, and about each other.
The characters in Mason’s story have a Victorian simplicity, which, while limiting their outward emotions, adds to the conflict with which they have to deal.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Evan Harrington, by George Meredith

From a 1903 review:

A social comedy. Evan, the son of a fashionable tailor brought up in the tastes and associations of a class higher than his own, suddenly finds himself confronted with the responsibility of his father’s debts. On the one side is duty, on the other are his love for a well born maiden and natural inclination. How Evan solves the problem happily, yet without abjuring his manhood is the business of the plot. The subtle play of motive and of class prejudice arising from such a situation produces abundant comedy. Evan and Rose Jocelyn, the glittering father and his stern featured spouse and the fascinating and unscrupulous Countess de Saldar are each in their way thoroughly Meredithian creations. The book has the merit of being easy to read.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Little Novels of Italy published in 1899: 1906 review-  Five stories of Renaissance times, the work of a scholar learned in the history and the literature of the period. The Duchess of Nona tells how an Italian adventurer brought home his beautiful and stupid English bride and tried to make her a tool in his ambitious schemes but was checkmated by her simple fidelity. Madonna of the Fig Tree is the apotheosis of a peasant girl, a half poetical fantasy of which the materials are taken from ordinary life in mediaeval cities. All reflect the swift changes from comedy to tragedy, the dramatic contrasts of exquisite culture and diabolical crime that characterised the epoch. The pregnant and nervous prose resembles Meredith’s.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

The Skipper’s Wooing, by William Wymark Jacobs

1906 review: Broad comedy from beginning to end. The skipper and his crew go port to port in search of a missing man, his sweetheart’s father, and meet diverting adventures. Another short tale, The Brown Man’s Servant, is appended

 

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged | 1 Response

Easy Light Supper Soup

soup from scratchRice Jambalaya

Ingredients:

1 cup Rice

1 lb pork

1 lb chopped ham

2 or 3 onions

pepper red or black to taste

1 heaping tablespoon lard

1 quart hot water or soup stock

Directions: Melt lard in deep saucepan. When hot add onions, chopped fine, pepper and pork cut into inch square pieces. Stir until brown, then add ham. When all are nicely browned add hot water or preferably stock. Cook ten minutes and add the rice. Let boil until rice is tender, stirring frequently to keep from burning.  Will serve six to eight.

P.S. This delicious dish may be varied in many ways. Cooked shrimps, oysters, fresh fish, salt fish, cooked cold fowl, roast beef, mutton, liver etc may be used instead of pork.

From a 1922 Good Housekeeping

You can also make it entirely with leftovers- including a couple of cups of cold cooked rice.  Just mince up the meats and some leftover cooked vegetables and add with rice to a quarter of water or soup stock.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Response

Free4Kindle: He that loves not books

before he comes to thirty years of age, will hardly love them enough afterward to understand them— Clarendon.

the bookshelf banner colour

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through.

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Many Cargoes: Many Cargoes Miscellaneous yarns in sailor’s lingo, love scenes on shipboard- A Lore Pax, sage histories of practical jokes, and funny misadventures, portraits of old salts, bigamous captains,love lorn mates and the like.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by Andy ADAMS, b 1859 (reviews from 1906)

The Log of a Cowboy 1903: A very direct and realistic narrative of a great cattle drive from Texas to the north. An excellent account of the cowboys of thirty years ago by a man who worked in that capacity for ten years.

A Texas Matchmaker

Cattle Brands, Western Camp fire Stories

These convey with the same knowledge and fidelity the actualities of ranch life. The growth of a big cattle ranch during the great cattle boom and all the various incidents of the life of a cowboy are vividly described.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Joseph Altsheler’s books, described in one publication as exciting and instructive tales for boys.

The Young Trailers, a Story of Early Kentucky

The Guns of Europe

Reader REview from Amazon: A fun fictional account of a factual event. Because it is written in the post Victorian period the conversations between the characters have a bit of an overly “respectful” and less familiar tone to them. Other than that, it is a nice read and good for those looking for WW1 literature other than Hemingway or Trumbo styled heroism.

Texan Scouts, the story of the Alamo and Goliad

The Forrest Runners, story of the great war trail in early Kentucky

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Oldfield, a Kentucky Tale of Life in the Last Century: Life and manners in a country town in Kentucky.

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged | 1 Response


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