Climate Prediction Fail

I am often accused of being anti-science, or just plain ignorant, because I am skeptical about global warming claims.

James Hanson, NASA’s global warming alarmist prophet, highly respected by global warming alarmists everywhere, has long predicted that by 2018 Lower Manhattan would be underwater and the Arctic would be ice-free.

Frankly, at this point if you’re not a skeptic, you’re ignorant. If this failed prediction does not make you sit up and blink and acknowledge that yes, the global warming camp vastly over-stated their case and they really don’t know enough to be changing policies and damaging the economy based on their predictions, then it isn’t science you believe in.

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Education and Mind (part I)

Charlotte Mason wrote six volumes on education, and in every one of them, in the front of each book, she put a list of the principles she thought were foundational to her method.

In her sixth volume, she did one better and devoted an entire chapter to nearly each one, although it became 20 principles instead of 18.

That sixth volume is titled ‘Toward a philosophy of education.’ That kind of scares people sometimes, especially homeschoolers- “philosophy of education” sounds a bit intimidating, right? Philosophy is for people who live in college towns and who have few responsibilities and never have to do dishes or clean up after sick children, deal with leaky diapers, or clean out the remains of mystery dinners from their refrigerators.

Except that’s not true. That might describe professional philosophers, but we all have a philosophy. It’s just a fancy way to say the way we think about life, the world, and our place in it. Some of us might say we don’t think about it at all, we are too busy living our lives and dealing with the messes. But that, too, is a philosophy. So we have one.

We all need, and we all *have* a philosophy of education. whether you carefully and purposefully think a philosophy of education through, or at least the beginnings of one, or whether you just bought some curriculum and started on page one, or whether you sent your kids to public school, you do still have some sort of philosophy of education.

Thinking it through will just save you some time and unnecessary steps later. As a homeschooler, thinking through what you believe about education will help you choose curriculum, materials, and a homeschooling style that are mutually supportive rather than constantly undermining one another. IT will help save you time and money so you do not purchase and attempt to force yourself to use materials that are contrary to what you really believe about education.

So, what is education to you? What is its purpose? What is it for? Who is it for?

Keep the big picture always before you: In a CM education, three of the distinctive are: the goal, the actor, and the method.

I’m not saying these are the only distinctives- just that these three seem to me to be particularly important.

“What is Charlotte Mason’s goal for education?

I think we could say many things about this, because he did, too. But one of the shortest things she sad is in the early part of volume six, and that is:
“”We seek by education to qualify children for life rather than for earning a living.” Now, learning things in order to earn a living is not always wrong. I think what Miss Mason would say is that this is important, but it is not itself *education,* and it is not the only reason to learn something. When you are looking over curriculum and planning your school year, you do not want everything in your curriculum to be solely about earning a living. Probably in the early years it doesn’t matter if none of it is only about earning a living. In high school you might begin to incorporate some skills and topics primarily for utilitarian (earning a living) reasons, but even then, that should not be the bulk of your time or expense.

What is education? Charlotte Mason believed it was about feeding the mind. Mason said that the mind requires ideas as the body requires food. How do we provide food for our children’s bodies? We serve them plenty of nourishing food, we serve meals regularly. We don’t expect them to just eat whatever they find in a haphazard, careless way on a daily basis (an occasional emergency situation might have us saying ‘just grab a sandwish or a bowl of cereal or whatever,’ and there are some who have to resort to begging (but they are probably not reading this blog). At any rate, most of the time in normal circumstances, we feed regular, nutritious meals). We might study some nutrition so their meals are well-balanced, and we don’t let the children spoil their appetites with too many sweets between meals (we would do well to apply this rule to ourselves as well, in both physical food and mind food)
The mind also needs regular feeding, nutritious food, and healthy servings from a wide variety.

When we feed the body, we don’t try to digest their food for them first and then serve them pellets of vitamins. We don’t do blood tests at every meal to make sure they absorbed the right nutrients. We don’t put windows on their stomachs so we can examine their digestive processes.

We watch the results- they are active, healthy, with bright eyes, clear skin, shining hair, and we assume they are likely getting what they need from their meals.

With the mind- we watch their alertness, how attentive they are, we listen to narrations, we see them making connections, and we see they are getting healthy meals for their minds. We do not administer true/false quizzes, vocabulary tests, fill in the blank pop quizzes, insist they memorize lists of dates and dry facts. We put them in touch with ideas, found in the best books, in well written, language, in good stories. We ask them to narrate in one form or another.

We trust their normal, healthy, unhindered minds to handle ideas in their stories. We might discuss with them in the same way we might play with them and given them physical scope for their growing bodies by taking them to parks, on walks, swimming, letting them climb and run and jump and sommersault down hills. We trust, but continue to supply healthy meals for mind and body and and oversea their healthy growth by providing healthy, natural ways to use minds and bodies.

Narration, telling back, is sometimes hard, but it’s natural. Children tend to ‘tell back’ in many ways on their own even if we don’t ask. Watch and you will see them drawing pictures of things that have happened or that they have seen or heard. They will incorporate those things into their pretend play, and into their talks with you. Narration is just one more formal step to stretch them and move the short-term memory and ideas over into the long-term.

This works, because children are born persons, with minds equipped to deal with knowledge.

Part II

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The Culture of Death

The left hates children.

“Children, the argument goes, should be considered first and foremost as problematic carbon-generating machines. With the planet facing almost-certain existential peril — Travis Rieder, a philosopher at Johns Hopkins University and the author of the piece, describes it as “the very real prospect of catastrophic climate change” — the decision to have children becomes a deep moral question. The decision to have more than one child, meanwhile, could be a serious moral failing. “If I release a murderer from prison, knowing full well that he intends to kill innocent people, then I bear some responsibility for those deaths,” Rieder helpfully explains. “Something similar is true, I think, when it comes to having children: Once my daughter is an autonomous agent, she will be responsible for her emissions. But that doesn’t negate my responsibility.” If you’re wondering if this was actually written by an android cleverly disguised as a human, join the club. Who refers to their daughter as a future “autonomous agent”? Who compares a young human being — a child of God, I would argue, with an immortal soul — to a “high-cost luxury” of which we “should limit our indulgence”?

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/453822/population-panic-returns-left-revives-argument-procreation-immoral”

 

Full Disclosure- we have seven (two adopted, although that’s still four too many biologicals for the culture of death).  We will have 14 grandchildren before the end of this coming spring.  Yes, if you’ve been following us, you missed a few.=)

I hope to have at least a dozen more. Not sorry.

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Al Franken and other slimes

Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was the sponsor for the private jet tax break provision in GOP tax plan. 

A small but hopefully growing number of leftists cagily acknowledging that yes, Bill Clinton might have been a sexual predator.  Will they admit his wife, who called Clinton’s victims ‘bimbo eruptions,’ was and is complicit?

Lena Dunham stands with writer for her movie Girls, who has been accused of raping a 17 year old.  The 17 year old is all grown up now. She’s passed a polygraph, and she has gone to the police.  Lena says she’s a liar.

Florida Dem Chairman resigns over allegations that he made women uncomfortable.  That sounds tepid and kind of stupid, but if you read the story, they had good reason to feel like he was a creep.  I’m going to quote Ace here:

“As the media continues spinning for powerful media liberals and liberal politicians, they’ll simultaneously keep asking “Who is responsible for making these men think they can get away with this?”

Rather than admitting, “Oh right, it’s us; everytime a Hollywood actor donates to Planned Parenthood and rapes a woman, we cover it up, and everytime a liberal champion-of-women president rapes a woman, we cover that up too,” they’ll decide the group responsible for encouraging predators to hunt more aggressively is… Republicans, of course.

Trump voters. Deplorable! Sad!”

You don’t get to be part of the party that has covered up, even defended, misrepresented, excused, and often held fundraisers by and for, or given standing ovations to the likes of Ted Kennedy (who left a woman to die alone in a car he drove into a lake while he swam back to his hotel and tried to pretend he wasn’t there and didn’t report the accident), Roman Polansky (who drugged and raped a kid and was *convicted* for it, Bill Clinton who has been credibly accused of multiple rapes and assaults and had to pay out to one of his victims, Weiner, Al Franken (who has been making misogynist ‘jokes’ for decades without being called out on it), and more, so much more, for so very, very long, and then have me believe you or even trust you, let alone jump when you say jump because  40 year old allegations pop up about a Republican (Roy Moore.) two weeks before an election.

Here’s the thing- I don’t currently  have a strong opinion yet on Moore’s guilt or innocence, although mostly I don’t think he’s doing himself any favors or making a credible defense. He can resign or fail in his reelection bid or win and then we’ll see of the accusations continue.  I won’t defend him at this point, but I won’t call for is resignation at this point, either. There are people right now defending Al Franken who are calling on Moore to be booted from the senate if he wins.  Al Franken- who forcibly stuck his tongue in a woman’s mouth and whose first defense of a photograph where he is miming groping a sleeping woman’s breasts is that was merely failed comedy.  You know what kind of man even thinks that should have been funny in the first place?

Al FRanken, who was elected by a mere 312 votes in an election where we know over 1000 felons voted illegally but were counted anyway.  Al Franken, who insisted an actress perform a kiss scene with him against her will, and who then used the opportunity he deliberately created (he also wrote the script calling for the kiss in the first place) and forcibly stuck his nasty, creeper’s tongue into her mouth.  In every single leftist discussion of Franken’s behavior they leave out the forced tongue, and so prove that they are complicit hypocrites.

Until the left stops covering up for, making excuses for, and outright lying in defense of the Frankens, Clintons, Kennedies, Roman Polanski and all their slimy ilk, I’m not going to dance and shout at their bidding.  I’m going to demand the left  shed themselves of their decades of defending men who rape, assault, abuse, and harrass women, and who leave them to drown to save their own precious political skin, and more, which the left hides, protects, and defends so long as they give lip service to  leftist causes.  Until that happens, they have less than no credibility.  They have given me good cause to be fairly certain that whatever they may say, they don’t care about women or children and they are not to be believed or trusted.

Update: Wonderful news- Terry Crews names the person who groped him at a public event (Adam  Venit, top exec at William Morris ) and files police report.  Also Adam Sandler knew.   Crews told Sandler about it at the same event when it happened.  Sandler must have talked about it with Venit, because Venit called and apologized the next day, but Crews didn’t think he sounded sincere.  As Crews points out: “Hollywood doesn’t even get the morals to its own movies.”

I think they ‘get it’.  They just reject it.  HOllywood has no more credibility than politicians and the media.  They certainly don’t get to tell me what is and isn’t moral, nor do they get to posture as some moral authority on any issue whatsoever until they have demonstrated the will and the power to clean up their own cesspool and rid themselves of the predators they have been rewarding for decades.

 

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PTSD in soldiers may be connected to childhood trauma

New research on posttraumatic stress disorder in soldiers challenges popular assumptions about the origins and trajectory of PTSD, providing evidence that traumatic experiences in childhood – not combat – may predict which soldiers develop the disorder. More here
“The vast majority of the soldiers (84%) were resilient, showing no PTSD symptoms at all or recovering quickly from mild symptoms.

The rest of the soldiers showed distinct and unexpected patterns of symptoms. About 4% showed evidence of “new-onset” trajectory, with symptoms starting low and showing a marked increase across the five timepoints. Their symptoms did not appear to follow any specific traumatic event.

Most notably, about 13% of the soldiers in the study actually showed temporary improvement in symptoms during deployment. These soldiers reported significant symptoms of stress prior to leaving for Afghanistan that seemed to ease in the first months of deployment only to increase again upon their return home.

What could account for this unexpected pattern of symptoms?

Compared to the resilient soldiers, the soldiers who developed PTSD were much more likely to have suffered emotional problems and traumatic events prior to deployment. Childhood experiences of violence, especially punishment severe enough to cause bruises, cuts, burns, and broken bones actually predicted the onset of PTSD in these soldiers. Those who showed symptoms of PTSD were more likely to have witnessed family violence, and to have experienced physical attacks, stalking or death threats by a spouse. They were also more likely to have past experiences that they could not, or would not, talk about. And they were less educated than the resilient soldiers.

According to Berntsen and colleages, all of these factors together suggest that army life — despite the fact that it involved combat — offered more in the way of social support and life satisfaction than these particular soldiers had at home. The mental health benefits of being valued and experiencing camaraderie thus diminished when the soldiers had to return to civilian life.

The findings challenge the notion that exposure to combat and other war atrocities is the main cause of PTSD.”

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