We are here!

We’ve arrived!

We’re very comfortably housed, although we do need to find a more permanent place asap as this is too expensive long term (and isn’t intended to be long term.)
I can only post pictures from my phone, not from the aux cord connecting phone to computer. I don’t like writing from my phone.
People have been super kind- we have some food in the fridge, plenty of fresh fruit and snacks, and a meal a day provided by different families so we get a chance to meet and visit.
Tonight (9 p.m. Wednesday night our time) a very nice family from the school came to ask if they could treat us to dinner and a trip to the mall. we needed to buy dh a cell phone, since his is totally broken. We were treated to dinner at a chicken bbq restaurant- you have a quarter chicken on a stick with rice, or unlimited rice (you choose), and a nice sweet and sour, mildly spicy chicken broth soup if you like (I did. It was wonderful). The chicken comes with calamansi (tiny limes), adorable tiny pepper which are pretty spicy, and you squeeze the juice from the lime into a tiny saucer (about the size of a tea party plate), mash up the pepper and add soy sauce, vinegar, or fishsauce (or your own combo). You tear chicken off the bone with your fingers, dip it in sauce, then scoop up a ball of rice with the same fingers (only eat with the fingers of one hand) and eat it. It’s delicious. Only I can’t remember what it’s called.*

Here’s the mall we visited: https://www.facebook.com/NCCCMallDavao

We also went to this supermarket in the mall: https://foursquare.com/v/nccc-supermarket/4dd9d651d1647fcf3e852828

We’re tired- besides the jet lag, none of us got much sleep at all from about 11 to 4 a.m because of the snarl and tangle of maneuvering our baggage to different terminal and airline and getting everything all squared away to get our boarding passes for that last flight.. We got maybe 90 minutes of sleep on the last plane and then we tried to stay up, but most of us failed (dh managed). Even the cherub finally fell asleep in the afternooon, after over 36 hours awake.

Interesting factoids: clothing brands hire the people who work in the clothing stores and sell you clothes, not the stores.
Bring your own toilet paper.
Hot water is only available in your shower if you buy an external hot water. I don’t know how they all work, but the one in our shower, the term ‘hot’ is rather an exaggeration.
We have a gecko in the room!
I have just eaten some freshly sliced pineapple so sweet it tastes like it was sugared.
The Filipino people must be the friendliest people on earth. Also, I am told, they love to sing.
You might find fresh green beans in three or four different places in the produce section because the produce is shelved based on the company which produced it, not on the product alone, so all of Farmer Jones’ produce is in one area, and all the McFarmed produce in another part (all in the produce section, though), and Choice farms produce yet another (Choice is the brand of eggplant I bought tonight).
It is hot and sticky, but honestly, not so bad as I was expecting. It helps a lot that we are arriving in December and not July.
There is a rule for the guest quarters that you may not eat Durian fruit inside the rooms.
They sell Durian milk in the supermarket, and also melon milk, along with the more familiar strawberry and chocolate. I thought it tasted fine, but the Boy didn’t like it at all.
I have seen two or three cows out grazing in an empty lot here and there in town, as well as plenty of poultry.

I’m sure there is more, but this is already too long, and I need to try to conquer jet lag by going to bed at a reasonable hour and hopefully, sleeping all night.=)


 

Posted in Davao Diary | Tagged , | 9 Responses

Free Kindle Books: “In science, read, by preference…”

“…the newest works ; in literature the oldest. The classic literature is always modern. New books revive and redecorate old ideas ; old books suggest and invigorate new ideas. — Bulwer.

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  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through.

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Man Alive, by G. K. Chesterton:  We live in a wonderful age when we can read G. K. Chesterton for free, you know?

Amazon Reader Review: Wise and extremely funny at the same time, it is the story of a man who refuses to die while he is still alive. He appears crazy, just because he refuses to take anything for granted, but that is how he manages to truly enjoy ordinary life as the best of adventures. This book is a hundred years old, but it is still incredibly actual. It also contains the best marriage proposal I have ever read. The style may not be as fast-paced as today’s bestsellers, but it is clever, witty and thoroughly enjoyable. The embedded mystery story is also very intriguing: Innocent Smith is accused of multiple crimes, from murder to burglary to polygamy, which are resolved in the most unexpected ways.
A wonderful book.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Zane Grey’s Desert Gold

Grey does use racial slurs- I don’t know if it’s in all his books, but many of them.

REader Review: The reader will find that they have easily uncovered the main plot of the tale by the end of the first chapter, but that isn’t what makes this story – and most of Zane Grey’s other books – special, it’s the trip that you take along the way. His descriptions of whatever clime they are in, of everyday struggles, adventurous travels, internal dialogues, etc.,etc., are what pull you in and make you a part of the journey.
I was a fan of Zane Grey novels as a young girl and have recently been reacquainting myself with them. I am so glad that I did. It’s not necessarily deep reading, but books such as this are historically accurate. I researched this one, and the story mentioned a Mexican rebel named Orazco. He raided along the border of Arizona and Texas from 1912 to 1915. This also fits with information about the Yaqui indians and their enslavement, and virtual annihilation, during that same period. That too was part of the story. The 9th Cavalry was also mentioned, and I found that it was posted at Douglas, AZ, to guard the border at that time.
The historical accuracy makes sense considering that Arizona was one of Zane Grey’s favorite places to be during this same time period.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

The Possessed, by Dostoyevsky

This is a free version of an old translation.  One of the characters speaks in French at times, and the French is not translated.  There are punctuation errors and occasional strange marks.  But it’s readable and free.

Reader Review of the text: This is a great book for anyone who loves ideas. Ideas matter, ideas change the world and shape human action, ideas come before action, ideas can save your life or destroy it! This book is about the destructive nature of certain ideas, namely atheism, socialism, nihilism and other “isms”. Ideas are so powerful that people will die and kill for them because ideas deal with the very nature of reality and being and when you believe you have ontological certitude then you can do anything!

The Possessed is about a group of revolutionarys in a province in russia. They do what most do, go to meetings to disscuss ideas, distribute pamphlets and try to organize. But what good does that do?, revolution is about action and one of these revolutionarys is trying to see how far he can push the rest into action, with the ambitious goal of total overthrow of all of russia. There are many characters in the book and they all represent different ideas, in fact that’s where the name of the book comes from “the possessed” are these guys compleatly taken over by their ideas and their willingness to do anything to acheive them, kill, die, or whatever it takes.

The thing about leftist revolutionarys is that they all share the same goal, utopia on earth through compleate reorginization of society and even human nature.Now how they get there is the argument.Should they have a bloody revolution like communists?, should they bring these changes gradually like the fabians?,should they burn society down and rise like a pheonix from the ashes like the nihilists? and there are many more ideas on how to achieve utopia.But the goal is always the same,the confusion comes in when people think that all these ideas are compeating. Thats why all progressives don’t define utopia they just fight for it instinctually. They are all fighting for “the cause” or for “change” or “progress” but when you understand the goal, a barley defined utopia that will be heaven on earth, then you get their code words and their mindset and that they comit their lives to it. They become “possessed” by it.

This is the other angle of the book, the establishment of the provincial town also belive vaguely in the ideas of the progressives. So not only are they powerless to stop these “demons” from reaking havoc, they basically are duped by and flattered by “the youth” who are just too overzealous in their ideals but in agreement of the goals. The older generation of “liberals” lead to the next generation of radicals, even though the older generation is horrified by their actions, they started them down that road.(just like in u.s.a. the new deal generation gave birth to the 60’s radicals and then were shocked by their actions, but these weren’t rebelious children as the false narrative goes but just fellow travellers who were tired of the slow pace of revolutionary change.)

This is why people can’t understand nihilists, they see them as just evil people who worship destruction.They are very difficult to sympathize with, however when you realize most nihilists belive in utopia as well and that they want to burn and destabilize all society and even kill large numbers of people, they do it to clear the way for a perfect utopian soceity. Like in hinduism the god shiva is “the destroyer”, but he’s not like our concept of the devil, he is a liberator who destroys to clear the way for rebirth, a fresh start. The other side of nihilism is twisted like this too in that all suffering comes from life and the only thing anyone can count on is death.Life is temporary and pointless so the only constant is nothingness so being the agent of death and nothingness is to relive suffering and bring forth the only truth, death.

Im sorry for the long review but the only way to understand the motives of communists, fascists, nazis, socialists,the french revolution and democrats (yes i went there) is to understand the ideas that motivate them.”The fire is in the minds of men.” I didn’t want to say to much about the plot cause that is fun and intricte read you should definitely experiance, I just wanted to lay down a premise for understanding the book.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Laddie, A True Blue Story, by Gene Stratton Porter- The story of a romance, narrated by the youngest sister of the protagonist.  I really enjoyed this- I read nearly all the Stratton-Porter books when I was around 12 or so.

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

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Play Figures to Make for Christmas: Boy, goats, wolf

You can print these on cardstock, color them, and cut them out, fold them, tape them to toilet paper tubes (cut down to about an inch tall) or blocks to use for 3D figures.  Make them as gifts. Have your kids make them as gifts for other children.  Stories you can tell:

Boy Who Cried Wolf

Shepherd boys at Christmas

David with his flocks

Some of Aesop’s Fablesboy-who-cried-wolf-two boy-who-cried-wolf-figures

Just make some up.

boy-who-cried-wolf-two

 

 

Directions for Making

The figures are made from colored construction paper, or from a heavy white drawing paper and colored with water color or Crayola. Fold the paper and place~the pattern on, with dotted line on fold. The boy’s body is tan, his clothes and cap dull blue; the goats are white, the rabbit tan, the fox and bee light brown, the wolf dark brown. (all the teacher instructions from this era are very rigid on colouring of the projects).   Paste the bodies together about half way down, bend’the laps on the feet inward and on top of each other, then paste onto a square of cardboard. Paste on the boy’s dothes and hat and slip the stick in between his hands. A real stick may be preferred here to a paper one.

Posted in crafts, pictures, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Free Kindle Books: Read, and refine your appetite;

learn to live upon instruction ; feast your mind and mortifv your flesh ; read, and take your nourishment in at your eyes, shut up your mouth, and chew the cud of understanding. — Congreve.

the bookshelf banner colour

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through.

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

American Fairy Tales, Frank L. Baum

Reader Review: Baum, who lived between 1856 and 1919, collected thirteen tales in this volume. The stories are humorous. They seem to be new stories, not versions of fairy tales found in other cultures. The Box of Robbers is a good example. A young girl is left alone at home, goes up to her attic, finds an ancient chest, opens it, and discovers that it contains three Italian robbers. Her reactions to the robbers and theirs to her and to America are funny. They insist that they must continue their profession, so they go down stairs and bring up to the attic a lot of the girl’s parent’s possessions. After awhile, the girl finds a funny excuse to lure the robbers back into the chest. “The story should teach us,” Baum writes, “not to interfere in matters that do not concern us. For had Martha refrained from opening Uncle Walker’s mysterious chest she would not have been obliged to carry downstairs all the plunder the robbers had brought into the attic.”

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by W. H. Mallock- I have read none of them, but I am downloading one for reading later in the Philippines, since I cannot take more than a couple books with me.  Russel Kirk wrote of Mallock:

“How is one to sum up the work of W. H. Mallock, which fills twenty-seven volumes, exclusive of ephemerae? Mallock is remembered chiefly for one book, The New Republic, and that his first, composed while he still was at Oxford – “the most brilliant novel ever written by an undergraduate,” says Professor Tillotson, justly.[38] (It is also the most brilliant accomplishment in its genre, after Thomas Love Peacock; and perhaps it is equal to Peacock at his best.) But other books of Mallock’s are worth looking into still — his theological and philosophical studies, his didactic novels, his zealous volumes of political expostulation and social statistics, even his books of verse.” (more at Wikipedia)

Memoirs of Life and Literature by W. H. Mallock- a sort of autobiography.  It’s also free at Gutenberg.  Here’s an excerpt:

“One May morning in London, when I had just completed a fortnight of political speaking in Fifeshire, a friend of mine, Ernest Beckett (afterward the second Lord Grimthorpe), came in a state of obvious excitement to see me, and talk, so he said, about something of great importance. He had, it appeared, been spending some weeks in the south of France, and was full of a project the value of which had, so he said, been amply proved by experiment. To me at first sight it seemed no better than lunacy. I could not for some time even bring myself to consider it seriously. This project was to play a new system at Monte Carlo. It was a system founded on one which, devised by Henry Labouchere, had been–such was Beckett’s contention–greatly improved by himself, and he and a companion had been playing it with absolutely unbroken success. ”

Is Life Worth Living?- also available at Gutenberg. It’s a rebuttal of the school of thought then known as ‘positivism’ and a defense of the Catholic church.  He dedicates it to Ruskin.Here’s an excerpt:

“Great art is a speculum reflecting life as the keenest eyes have seen it. All its forms and imagery are of value only as this. Taken by themselves, ‘_the best in this kind are but shadows_.’ We have to ‘_piece out their imperfections, with our thoughts_;’ ‘_imagination has to amend them_,’ and ‘_it must be our imagination, not theirs_.'[23] In examining a work of art, then, we are examining life itself; or rather, in examining the interest which we take in a work of art, in examining the reasons why we think it beautiful, or great, or interesting, we are examining our own feelings as to the realities represented by it. And now remembering this, let us turn to certain of the world’s greatest works of art–I mean its dramas: for just as poetry is the most articulate of all the arts, so is the drama the most comprehensive form of poetry. In the drama we have the very thing we are now in want of. We have life as a whole–that complex aggregate of details, which forms, as it were, the mental landscape of existence, presented to us in a ‘_questionable shape_,’ at once concentrated and intensified. And it is no exaggeration to say that the reasons why men think life worth living, can be all found in the reasons why they think a great drama great.”

A Critical Examination of Socialism Here is an excerpt (from Gutenberg)

"CHAPTER III
THE ROOT ERROR OF THE MARXIAN THEORY.
ITS OMISSION OF DIRECTIVE ABILITY.
ABILITY AND LABOUR DEFINED
In approaching the opinions of another, from whom we are about to
differ, we gain much in clearness if at starting we can find some point
of agreement with him. In the case of Marx we can find this without
difficulty, for the first observation which our subject will naturally
suggest to us is an admission that, within limits, his theory of
production is true. Whatever may be the agencies which are required to
produce wealth, human effort is one of them; and into whatever kinds
this necessary agency may divide itself, one kind must always be labour,
in the sense in which Marx understood it--in other words, that use of
the hands and muscles by which the majority of mankind have always
gained their livelihood.

It is, moreover, easy to point out actual cases in which all the wealth
that is produced is produced by labour only. The simplest of such cases
are supplied us by the lowest savages, who manage, by their utmost
exertions, to provide themselves with the barest necessaries. Such
cases show that labour, wherever it exists, produces at least a minimum
of what men require; for if it were not so there would be no men to
labour. Such cases show also another thing. The most primitive races
possess rude implements of some kind, which any pair of hands can
fashion, just as any pair of hands can use them. These rude implements
are capital in its embryonic form; and so far as they go, they verify
the Marxian theory that capital is nothing but past labour crystallised.

But we need not, in order to see labour, past and present, operating and
producing in a practically unalloyed condition, go to savage or even
semi-civilised countries. The same thing may be seen among groups of
peasant proprietors, which still survive here and there in the remoter
parts of Europe. These men and their families, by their own unaided
labour, produce nearly everything which they eat and wear and use. Mill,
in his treatise on _Political Economy_, gives us an account of this
condition of things, as prevailing among the peasants in certain
districts of Germany. "They labour early and late," he says, quoting
from a German eulogist. "They plod on from day to day and from year to
year, the most untirable of human animals." The German writer admires
them as men who are their own masters. Mill holds them up as a shining
and instructive example of the magic effect of ownership in intensifying
human labour. In any case such men are examples of two things--of
labour operating as the sole productive agency, and also of such labour
self-intensified to its utmost pitch. And what does the labour of these
men produce? According to the authority from which Mill quotes, it
produces just enough to keep them above the level of actual want. Here,
then, we have an unexceptionable example of the wealth-producing power
of labour pure and simple; and if we imagine an entire nation of men
who, as their own masters, worked under liked conditions, we should have
an example of the same thing on a larger and more instructive scale. We
should have a whole nation which produced only just enough to keep it
above the level of actual bodily want."

 

 

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

A Dash for a Throne, adventure novel

Amazon Reader Review:

Shades of the PRISONER OF ZENDA, THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER, & THE MAD KING – another tale of royal impersonation replete with intrigue, villains, heroes, & derring-do. Anthony Hope’s THE PRISONER OF ZENDA was published in 1894. Marchmont’s novel in 1899. Marchmont wrote using the same theme but did not directly copy Hope’s work as Edgar Rice Burroughs did in THE MAD KING. Modern readers should be aware that this is a 19th century novel set in the 19th century. It has a slower pace – No car crashes, explosions, machine guns, etc. It is very well written with a believable plot and full of interesting intrigue, villainous plots, horseback chases & carriage crashes. This review is from the free Kindle edition released December 18, 2012.

Other titles by same author, so far as I can tell, all in a similar vein.

By Wit of a Woman

The Man Without a Memory

An Imperial Marriage

By Right of Sword

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Books by Emma Marshall- she wrote historical fiction and history books for children in the 1800s.  A reviewer at the time writes “MRS MARSHALL’S HISTORICAL STORIES Mrs Marshall’s stories based for the most part on the lives and times of eminent Englishmen and Englishwomen have been the means of awakening and cultivating a taste for history and literature throughout the English speaking world”- Canon AINGER

Penshurst Castle (published in 1893) A study of the domestic life of Sir Philip Sidney and of the manners of reign of Elizabeth

Under the Mendips, a tale: Review from an 1886 reviewer who is tartly disdainful, but so funny it makes me want to read the book :

“Although manslaughter, Socialism, and the Bristol riots of 1831 form the subject of Under the Mendips, it is not to be accused of sensational effects. It is throughout a gentle story in which strong events are much disguised by the feminine telling. Joyce Falconer is a good girl of a country breeding more distinctive than would be possible in our days but otherwise not differentiated from all the other excellent young heroines in early teens who wear cotton frocks and clustering curls and whom their excellent fathers call Sunshine, a sickly habit. But Joyce’s brother has the mark of his time, a certain Georgian flavour which is well given. So is the housewifeliness of the mother who washes her own china and silver and withstands the popular education movement fostered by Mrs Hannah More; so too is the sentimentality of the secondary heroine who sighs for a high born lover and writes poetry. How long past are the days in which the secondary heroines of life and fiction laid themselves open to mild satire by pursuits and humours of this kind. Of course Mrs Marshall is better in the passages of household manners than in the passages of movement. The wild maiden, Susan Priday, who is anxious about the spiritual condition of her father is not a very living character. In one scene when this father makes a desperate attack upon Joyce and Susan comes to the rescue the action is indeed not a little grotesque. The villain is felled by the hero and Susan seats herself on her father’s chest. In this position she sketches the family history, makes some observations on Mrs Hannah More’s reforms, gushes about a baby and releases the murderous Priday only after the lapse of four pages of literature. Mrs Marshall treats all the historical parts of her story instructively and her teaching is throughout religious and honest. If her mob is too readily appeased by the presentation of buns by the heroine and by her pious exhortations, the burning of Queen Square and the Mansion House is yet given, according to the record of the facts. The buns and the exhortations save the lives of Mrs Marshall’s favourite personages only.”

Bristol Bells, a Story of the Eighteenth Century

 

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guessing Games to Play

Place three books on the table, in a pile, each one projecting just a little beyond the others. Two people in the group have to be in on the ‘secret.’  One of those two goes out, and then any other person in the group points to any one of the three books. The absent guest is called back by the other person in the know, and points to the correct book.

There are two ways of doing this. One is by means of the words used in calling the child back. The signal for the top book is the word ” Ready!” for the second book the word “Come” and for the third or lowest book the words, “Come on,” are always used when calling the absent person back.

Another way is for to use handmovements.  Decide in advance how you  should know the correct book by watching the other person’s movements with her hands. If the top book is the correct one, she will, in a casual way, place her hand to her forehead. If the second book is the correct one, she places her finger on or beside her nose, and for the third or lowest book, she places her hand against her chin.

As soon as another guest thinks that he has discovered the secret, let him try to do it.

the-book-game-the-commonroom Still another book number game is to first place 9 books in a grid, 3X3, and again, two people must know the secret. One of the two people who know the trick leaves the room. Anybody else chooses a book.  The person is called back, and the one who knows the trick points to a book and asks “Is it is this one?”

We find it works best to lay the books out on the floor and use a pointer- like a broom stick or a yard stick. Or if you have a very small group, use 9 playing cards and a pencil for a pointer.

The trick is that you basically see the book as a map of the grid of nine books. If the chosen book (or playing card, if you haven’t 9 books) is the second book in the top row, you point to any book in the grid, but you *touch* it in the center  of the top edge.  After that, it doesn’t matter what you do or how you ask, you have already told the other person which book it is and it only remains for you to tap the correct book at any time and he will say yes.

If the chosen book is the center, the first time you ask ‘is it this one?’ you tap the book in the middle.  If it is the one in the bottom left, you tap the book in the bottom left corner.

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