1920 Call to Stop Dumbing Down Classics for the Nursery

Classics in the Nursery

Rebecca West (1920) (probably this Rebecca West)

No parent whose memory goes back to the pinafore age will buy this new edition of “Tanglewood Tales” that Messrs. Blackie have issued, for it has been edited most grown-uppishly. (this is the edition I recommend~DHM)

W. K. L., who was surely born in a state of middle age, announces in a prefatory note that he has compressed “some of the exuberantly full diction of the original text,” forgetting that in those days we might be bored by piousness, but never by prolixity.

So long as it was the right kind of story, with courage flashing bright weapons under dark towers and villainy working a twenty-four-hour day, we did not mind how long it took in the way. In those days we would read the worst and dullest Dumas as nowadays we could hardly read the best, and Eugene Sue’s “The Wandering Jew,” which it is inconceivable that any adult could now get through except in prison, seemed the most fluent and colored of stories.

Most modern children’s books are actively hostile to this tendency of the child mind and give these sharp little mental teeth the softest of predigested pap. And the mischief done leaves its mark on literature, for the child brought up on the standard British “juvenile gift-book” about a little girl who goes into a wood and falls asleep and dreams of insipid fairies, certainly grows up into the Tired Business Man. It is therefore a shame, a serious shame, that Hawthorne, who had the ideal manner of story-telling, who was long-winded and yet always carried the undimmed lamp of fancy so that the child knew thai it must keep on listening or lose something fine, should be forcibly brought into line with the modern superstition of infant fatuity.

But that is not the only blemish on this edition, for “The American setting of the tales has been omitted as needlessly local in color for other readers,” and that is a great pity. Not only were the spectacled student who told the tales, and Periwinkle and her playfellows (each with an entrancing name) who listen to them, the very pleasantest of company, and the woodland rambles so prettily described that they overcame the infant aversion for descriptions, but they were also of historical and literary value because they were introductions to a continent which has passed away, and now exists only in literature.

From the setting of “Tanglewood Tales” and from “Little Women,” and to a certain extent from ” Melbourne House” and “The Wide Wide World” and “The Lamplighter” (although the infant mind could see that the authors of these latter works were pious humbugs and given to the disingenuous moral babble that one accepted as the grown ups’ harmless favorite sin), one became acquainted with Lincoln’s America. It enlarged the view from the nursery window by presenting a world of children who spoke English and who yet lived in a place entirely different from England, with a difference that did not consist, as one understood that foreigners usually did, of palms and a climate salubrious for pirates. This world had a tart and pleasant flavor like the cranberries that its inhabitants were so constantly gathering. It was a world less easeful than the one we knew, and lacking in its sentimental furniture. Here there was no “big house,” no vast sleek parks, no young heirs riding about on ponies, no heiresses with golden curls and mobs of nurses and governesses, no saintly children doubly gilded with piety and the inheritance of great possessions. Here children were brought up in a uniform atmosphere of comfortable thrift by grown-ups who seemed to have a prejudice against expenditure on moral grounds.

It is a pity to have robbed ” Tanglewood Tales ” of its New England setting. But how good the stories are even without it!

The classical legends must be introduced somehow into the infant mind if it is not to spend the rest of its life tripping up over literary allusions. And Hawthorne was the very man to do it. He was a great artist, although he was sodden with the didacticism which made him sketch the plot of a fantasy in his notebook and add to it ” the whole to be made symbolical of something”; and that failing does not matter here, for children love an honest prig. There could not be invented a prettier story nor a more persuasive lesson in manners than his “Philemon and Baucis.” And “the Gothic or romantic guise” which he admits having given to the legends, and which turns Proserpina’s playmates into sea-nymphs plainly out of Hans Andersen, is the very thing for children, who still love color more than form, and fancy more than imagina tion. He was on the right lines, too, in refusing to mitigate altogether the horrors of his originals, and giving children, who always love the terror that has to be braved and the monster that has to be slain, the shuddering joy of the Gorgon’s head and the Minotaur. In every way he is a lesson to the modern writer of “juvenile fiction” who works under the delusion that his business is to peptonize the world for the child mind. —

Rebecca West in The Athenium

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Davao Diary: Mostly About Cheese

Another Day’s Entry for my Davao Diary (but I forget which day this was):

My two boys went snorkeling today with a bunch of people from the school. We were invited as well, but the invitation included some real concern about how the Cherub would get on and off the boat, and that concern was not misplaced- my husband showed me video later, and I don’t think she would have enjoyed it. I am not sure *I* would have done well with it.

So Cherub and I stayed home, washed dishes, swept the little floor with the littler broom (which has me bending over to use it), did laundry, made beds, looked up recipes for some new vegetables as well as some ones I already knew, but by another name (singkamas are jicamas, and a generous friend from church very kindly gave me two, as well as some mangos, yum), practice the Bisaya words to the doxology (I’ll share in another post), and I fought with the internet, which has not been very friendly to us lately. Except for the internet feud, I didn’t mind. I enjoy quiet, downtime to read, research, rest, rejuvenate.

I have two favourite dresses here, and I had splattered oil all over the front of one of them when making the discovery that jackfruit seeds explode in hot oil. It appears the oil splatters did come out of my dress. I did not have Dawn dishwashing soap, so I just used the dishwashing soap I had, let it soak in, and washed as usual. I am relieved. I don’t have that many dresses here, and I won’t ever find anything here that fits me, so I need to make the clothes I have last (and I also need to exercise more. Can walking to the laundry room and back please count?)

The guys were supposed to bring a lunch, and I wasn’t sure what to pack, since we don’t have an ice chest and I had not noticed traditional-for-us lunchbag foods in the supermarkets. I might make sushi and deviled eggs another time. I will also be asking around to find out what are typical picnic, lunchbag type foods for Filipinos. We went grocery shopping again yesterday morning, something I have done more in this 2.2 weeks than I normally do in a month back in the U.S.

But I found some sliced ham lunch meat in the freezer section, hooray (I did not see any sliced turkey or beef lunchmeat)! Later my husband and son told me it tastes weird, so I bought them two packages, and the second one is untouched several days later.
I also bought them a treat of a package of sliced cheese. We were told dairy is expensive here, and this is true. But it turns out, it’s imported from New Zealand, which means it’s from grassfed cows! Cheese from the milk of grassfed cows is expensive in America, too! This cheese was actually less than I would pay for grassfed dairy cow products in the US. Of course, I can seldom afford them in the US, but cows fed on pasture produce much more nutritious and healthy, nourishing foods, both meat and dairy products, than stalled cows fed on manmade, corn based feeds. So, while cheese will still be a rare treat here, I am happy that when we buy it, it will be from pastured animals, and for less than I would pay for that treat at home.

The breads here are delicious, although mostly white flour is what I see. They also had lettuce, tomatoes, and even mustard, so the boys were well set (note: they didn’t bother with the vegetables. Sigh.)

Cherub and I ate tuna chorizo- hers was fried and sliced, mine was in a sandwich with the vegetables the boys had ignored, shrimp chips, and mangos for breakfast, and noodle soup for lunch for me and rice with tomatoes and fish for her.

Speaking of meals, for supper, btw, believe it or not, we had Burger King. There’s a new Burger King here, and since our son used to work there in the states, he wanted to visit it, and he brought back dinner for us.

But what about the snorkeling trip, you ask? It was a good one. But that will have to be another post.

For this post, I thought I’d leave you with some interesting information about farming in New Zealand, and why it is that New Zealand dairy products are grassfed and ours are only grassfed for expensive specialty markets. mostly, it’s because New zealand farmers are not subsidized by the government, so there’s no benefit to using surplus grains like corn. (incidentally, because of Cherub’s allergies, I am still reading labels assiduously here in the Philippines, and I am delighted to see I almost never finding corn based ingredients except in actual corn products, like corn chips)

There’s a brief history of New Zealand farm practices here, and historically and politically how they went from government subsidies to free market practices here.

The Cato Institute:
“Despite initial protests, farm subsidies were repealed in 1984. Almost 30 different production subsidies and export incentives were ended. Did that cause a mass exodus from agriculture and an end to family farms? Not at all. It did create a tough transition period for some farmers, but large numbers of them did not walk off their land as had been predicted. Just one percent of the country’s farmers could not adjust and were forced out.

The vast majority of New Zealand farmers proved to be skilled entrepreneurs — they restructured their operations, explored new markets, and returned to profitability. Today, New Zealand’s farming sector is more dynamic than ever, and the nation’s farmers are proud to be prospering without government hand-outs.

Prior to the 1984 reforms, subsidies stifled farm productivity by distorting market signals and blocking innovation. Many farmers were farming for the sake of the subsidies. For example, nearly 40 percent of the average New Zealand sheep and beef farmer’s gross income came from government aid.

When the subsidies were removed, it turned out to be a catalyst for productivity gains. New Zealand farmers cut costs, diversified their land use, sought nonfarm income, and developed new products. Farmers became more focused on pursuing activities that made good business sense.” (btw, in case you freak out over the Cato Institute, the HUFFPO has a similar article)

It’s something we should do in the U.S. Government agriculture subsidies have actually harmed our health there, not to mention skewed the market both financially and nutritionally. (see eggs don’t cause heart attacks, sugar does)

More on the snorkeling trip the next time the blog allows me to post.

Posted in Davao Diary, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Free Kindle Books, Because Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.

Quote in title by Joseph Addison

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post.  And yet, still some duds slip through, no guarantees, but plenty of good will. Hope you find some gems to your taste!

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

FREE! The World’s Greatest Books, volume 19, Travel and ADventure
Reader Review: It’s a great read and perfect for airport layovers, doctors waiting rooms and sitting in Starbucks. I like the vicarious adventure one receives when reading a travel log written by someone that took the time to do it right, i.e., no particular schedule or deadline. No airlines. No 5 star hotels. This is adventure travel. It’s a fun, interesting, and informative read.

You may also like:

My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell for a little over nine dollars.

Or A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson for around seven dollars.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Roughing It by Mark Twain (FREE!!)

TRAILIN’ WEST: FREE- 7 New and Classic Tales of Frontier Danger and Romance – FREE
by Louis L’Amour and Max Brand

FREE! A Texas Ranger, by William McCleod Raine

Or you may like Yondering by Louis Lamoure for 5 dollars.

for 7.99 you can get the kindle version of his autobiographical Education of a Wandering Man, one I think nearly everybody will appreciate, even if you are not fans of westerns.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Free!!Joseph Andrews, vol 1 by Henry Fielding (get all volumes of Joseph Andrews for .99)
Charles O’Malley, the Irish Dragoon (at one time, Arthur Mee, Editor and contributing author of the Books of Knowledge) said it was one of the greatest books of all time.

Or you might enjoy the following escapist reading selections:

The King’s Scarlet by Jack Danielski for 4.99
Reader Review:
Chivalry comes naturally to Royal Marine captain Thomas Pennywhistle, but in the savage Peninsular War, it’s a luxury he can ill afford. Trapped behind enemy lines with vital dispatches for Lord Wellington, Pennywhistle violates orders when he saves a beautiful stranger, setting off a sequence of events that jeopardize his mission. The French launch a massive manhunt to capture him. His Spanish allies prove less than reliable. The woman he rescued has an agenda of her own that might help him along, if it doesn’t get them all killed.
A time will come when, outmaneuvered, captured, and stripped of everything, he must stand alone before his enemies. But Pennywhistle is a hard man to kill and too bloody obstinate to concede defeat.

MItford Bedside Companion, 9.99

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

FREE! Reinventing The Liberal Arts, College in One Year for 5 dollars.
you won’t get the degree, but if you are a self-starter, you are likely to get a better education.

FREE!
Sharing Nature@ Nature Awareness Activities for All Ages
Blurb: Sharing Nature with Children, selling more than half a million copies, sparked a worldwide revolution in nature education. Now that classic has been rewritten, with newly added activities and games—and combined with Sharing Nature with Children II in one complete volume. Fans of the original nature awareness classic will love this new version, which incorporates the author’s latest insights. This phenomenal teaching tool, with its highly effective nature activities, will thrill new readers.

Not Free, but one of the best books on CM published thus far, Karen Glass’ Consider This.

Not Free:
2.99 Praying For Your Prodigal

Not even a book, let alone free-
This portable external battery pack is what I bought for our trip, which involved nearly 30 hours of travel, and now life in a temporary guesthouse which has one outlet per bedroom. It will recharge our devices (kindles, phones, iPods) 4-5 times (always 4, sometimes nearly 5 depending which devices and how low they were).

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing.  If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something.  Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless.  Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal.  And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books.  Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already.   If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers.   Personally,  I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently.  Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices.  Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Day Two

These are going to be out of order, and possibly posted more than once, largely due to my wonky and incredibly frustrating issues with the blog and my internet connection. Apologies for that.
Hope you haven’t already seen this five times.

Day Two:
Fun facts:
We Left Chicago in the morning at 10 or 10:30 our time. We flew for 13 hours and it never got dark- every time we opened a window shade, the sun was blindingly bright. The window shades were mostly kept shut because many passengers were sleeping. It was night by the time we left Tokyo and flew to Manila. I saw sunrise from the plane, and it was lovely- all silver and platinum, and fairly speedy.
We are around five hundred miles from the equator here. The sun sets early, and there’s not much of a twilight. It’s late afternoon and then around 6 p.m. and in fifteen minutes or so (at least it feels that way), it’s night.
The Philippines driving looks scary, but it was described to me that people here drive defensively, and people in the US are offensive drivers. I can see that once it’s been explained. People make U-turns from the far right lane over to the left, and cross traffic, turn right or left on red, and cut into traffic. Pedestrians dart through traffic. Other drivers may not always be happy about it, but they aren’t aggressive about it, either. They stop and let people who show they mean it slip in.
Some houses have an outside kitchen- essentially a sink and a counter and a place to plug in your stove top burner or frier. Those kitchens are called dirty kitchens- kind of like a summer kitchen in Indiana, but without the walls, and only a partial ceiling (enough to cover the immediate area from rain).
Most of my K-dramas that I have been following are not available via DramaFever in the Philippines. So I need to find a K-drama streaming site available here. (Hola works)
I think I left my kindle on an airplane.=( (Nope, I DEFINITELY lost it somewhere in an airport).
Everything but the mall closes at Christmas- so a house may not be ready before the 1st of January because there are no painters, plumbers, carpenters, roofers, cleaners, available to finish getting it ready for the next renter.
Milk is expensive here, and mostly sold in small shelf stable boxes, maybe around a quart. I was told one brand is fresher, but it comes In bottles the size of smaller waterbottles at home. I mentioned the Durian flavored one, which I liked but the boy did not. Tonight I tried a melon flavor, and it was delicious. Think of a cold, creamy cremesicle, with noteo f the flavor hints of popsicle stick or paper wrapper, only better. I don’t know what the boy might have thought of melon flavor, because I didn’t share it. These bottles are around .70 each, and they contain ingredients like “Milk, sugar, durian meat,” or ‘milk, sugar, melon flavor.’
Tonight a lovely Korean American family took us out to dinner- they gave us a choice of various options. I don’t remember what the other options were because when they said doubtfully, ‘or perhaps a Korean restaurant, they have a buffet tonight?’ All the other offers flew out of my head and left me with an empty head- other than the excited burst of saliva. IT was delicious, and the family were delightful, interesting, and very kind.
We were confronted for the first time by children begging for pesos outside the restaurant. They were quite pitiful, and I would have given in and given them something if I had any pesos, but I understand that isn’t what you are supposed to do. They may well have been tiny scam artists for all I know, intellectually. Emotionally, they still linger. They weren’t particularly tragic figures. They seemed clean and while they were slight, most Filipinos seem tiny and undernourished to me because my frame of reference is a particularly corn-fed section of middle America. There were three, on older girl and two little boys. And they linger.
The Boy is a center of attention everywhere he goes. He is so tall he stands out a bit even in the states, but here, he literally is head and shoulders and a bit of pectoral muscle above everybody else. He is also, and I do not just speak as his mother, quite handsome. He says six strangers in an hour came up and asked if he played basketball this evening. Basketball, he will tell anybody who asks, is the sport in which he is least capable, and it seems a cruel irony, that. But anyway, people stare, point, smile, and come up to talk to him.
We have looked at 4 different houses today, and this is our second day here. The pictures I will share when I can share them (my phone to computer transfer process is glitch) will look rather ghetto and raw. Please understand this is because of our low budget for housing. We’re going for frugal here. The fourth house we looked at is a place where even my mother could be comfortable and feel good about us living in, it’s just priced outside of our means (around 600 dollars a month, I think).
I took two loads of laundry out to the laundry room today (across the yard from me) and while I was figuring out the very different washing machine, the helper came out to show me how to operate it, and said she would take care of drying and folding them. A few hours later, we found them in the laundry room clean, dry, and tidily folded or hung up
It is December 15 and there are periwinkles, portulaca, and several other flowers I don’t know blooming all over the place. (Ixora is another one)
One of the houses we looked at had a coconut tree in the backyard, and it wasn’t even the most expensive house.
My husband has met a couple of his potential students, and I’ve had a whiff or two of a couple things I could do when the housing question is settled.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Free Kindle Reads: Written learning is a fixed luminary…

Tradition is but a meteor, which, if it once falls, cannot be rekindled.
Memory, once interrupted, is not to be recalled.
But written learning is a fixed luminary, which, after the cloud that had hidden it has passed away, is again bright in its proper station.
So books are faithful repositories, which, may be awhile neglected or forgotten, but when opened again, will again impart instruction.
Johnson.

colorful book border

  • Unless otherwise noted, books are free but this can change without notice. Doublecheck.
  • If you click a link and it doesn’t finish loading, just hit refresh. Sometimes the page just kind of hangs for some reason, I am not sure why.
  • If I don’t say, “I loved this book” or “I read this,” Or something along those lines, I haven’t read the book. I haven’t read most of these. I’m just your book bird-dog, sniffing up potential good reads.
  • I use various search methods to come up with titles. Then I read the blurbs, a couple of the best and worst of the reviews, and sometimes scan the free pages.
  • I screen out so many this way that I end up *not* posting more books I’ve looked over than I post. And yet, still some duds slip through. I do my best not to let that happen, but forgive me when it does.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Exposition of the Apostles Creed FREE
About the Author:
Robert James Dodds was born near Freeport, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, on August 29, 1824. His parents were Archibald and Margaret (Davidson) Dodds. Possessed from his youth with integrity of character and amiability of disposition he was dedicated to God for the work of the ministry. At an early age he began his classical studies under the direction of his pastor, the Rev. Hugh Walkinshaw, and made such rapid progress and proficiency in all the departments of literature taught in a College, that he was recommended as sufficiently advanced to begin the study of theology in the spring of 1844. He studied theology in the Allegheny and Cincinnati Seminaries, and was licensed by the Pittsburgh Presbytery, June 21, 1848.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

In and Out of Three Normandy Inns, Free.

Anna Bowman Blake Dodd (1858-1929) was a US journalist and author whose anti-socialist sf novel, The Republic of the Future (.99), or Socialism a Reality (1887 chap), set in New York in 2050 CE, offers a scathing and comical portrait of egalitarianism brought to the uttermost, resulting in a technologically advanced antlike Dystopia. The tale actively deprecates Feminism.

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

Peveril of the Peak, by Sir Walter Scott, Free!  You must read some Sir Walter Scott this year.  I insist.
Excerpt: Let the destruction of the father and mother, with the ruin of our ancient house, satisfy your resentment for any wrong which you have ever received at my husband’s hand.”

” Hold your peace, housewife,” said the Knight ; ” you speak like a fool, …

vintage BOOK with owls lettering

NOT free:

9.99 for Kindle: Cool: How the Brain’s Hidden Quest for Cool Drives Our Economy and Shapes Our World
by Steven Quartz (Author), Anette Asp (Author)
Reviews: Review
“A refreshing new analysis of conspicuous consumption . . . Essential for all psychology collections.” ―Dale Farris, Library Journal (starred review)

“This engrossing history merges evolutionary biology and economics to explain our spending habits.” ―Mental Floss

“Cool is as important as it is elusive. People want to find it and brands want to be it, but what is it and why do we all care so much? Cool probes the far reaches of our brain to answer these questions, shining a light on the essence of cool and the fundamental motivations that make us all human.” ―Jonah Berger, Associate Professor of Marketing, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and bestselling author of Contagious

“Both a sweeping history and a scientific exploration, Cool charts the evolution of an ineffable concept that, whether or not we realize it, influences our decision making every day. Reading this book can’t make you cool, but it can give you the tools to figure out why cool matters.” ―Richard Florida, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute, University of Toronto, and author of The Rise of the Creative Class

“Steven Quartz and Anette Asp expose a mystery that plagues us all–spending–and do so by uncovering the biological roots that guide our desire for status while following ancient rules that kept our evolutionary forebears alive. They remind us that forces that drive our modern habits were put in place long before there was anything modern. Cool is a delightful book that will inspire discussion.” ―Read Montague, Director, Human Neuroimaging Laboratory, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, and author of Your Brain Is (Almost) Perfect

“An ambitious work that explores well-worn theories in detail before throwing them out, this book rejects the common idea that the world is degenerating into morally suspect, puerile, corporate-manipulated consumption. In its place, the authors propose that inner moral values and external social ones are in fact very much aligned, and that our basic drive to signal social status makes the world a better place. Trendsetters rejoice: Quartz and Asp have got your back.” ―Publishers Weekly

Housekeeping:

Subject to change without notice: Free Titles were free at the time I copied and pasted the links. But they don’t always stay free. The older, public domain books should, because they are all in the public domain, but sometimes….

Shameless money grubbing: I thought this was common knowledge, but it turns out it’s not- these are affiliate links. If you click on a free title and download it, I get….. nothing. If you click on a free title and while you are at Amazon also buy something else, I get….. something. Depending on what you buy, it will probably be somewhere between 4% and 7.5% of what you spend (I don’t get a percentage on penny sales) but I don’t pretend to understand how all of that side works. People have tried to explain, but they start with numbers and my ears buzz and I can’t hear.

Also, Swagbucks remains my favorite source for free Amazon gift cards. And if you haven’t joined, please click on the link and join so that I can keep getting free Amazon gift cards because I am still shameless. Of course, if you regularly shop on line, you can also sign up for ebates, and then always check ebates first, before you do your regular shopping. You can get quite a tidy sum back on the purchases you were going to make anyway, which is not a bad deal. And then you can use the money for books- or for other things.=)

Don’t have a Kindle? : You don’t have to have a Kindle to take advantage of these offers. You can read them on various free reading apps. I often read mine on my laptop if they are short enough books. Or I will start there to see if I want to finish it later or remove it from my Kindle already. If you’re curious, this is the Kindle I have, and I have used others and mine remains my favorite. Mine has Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi and I don’t have commercial screensavers. Personally, I don’t like Kindle Fires because I am a crank like that.

If you like these free listings, you should also like my Facebook page, because I list other free titles there several times each week.

Yes, my Kindle gets slow because I stuff it too full since I have no sense of proportion when it comes to owning books, both real and virtual.

You can left click on a title on your Kindle and delete it from your device, while still keeping it in your list of titles at Amazon in case you want to add it back to your Kindle later without paying for the title all over again. Don’t delete it from folder at Amazon unless you want to rid yourself of it permanently. Now that I have my tricksy little new phone, I have added it to my list of devices to which I can download devices. Woot!

commentary sources: Most of the blurbs and book descriptions above are not mine, but come from reviews on Amazon’s page.

To organize the books on your kindle

Thanks for reading!

Posted in Books | Tagged | Leave a comment


  • The Common Room on Facebook

  • Amazon: Buy our Kindle Books

  • Search Amazon


    Try Audible and Get Two Free Audiobooks

  • Brainy Fridays Recommends: