About Reading

Reflections at a Funeral is a great article. Scholars from The Common Room, The Beehive, and Deweys’ Treehouse (see the sidebar for links) will all be delighted.

Consider:

“If I were to make a list of the best books I have read, and would recommend to adults and children alike, I would begin with Winnie the Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner. It would not be because I am in arrested development, though I may be. It would be because the English is masterly, the limning of a magical world adroit, and Shepherd’s drawings exquisite. But to enjoy them you need to appreciate the language (and not be too full of yourself).”

There’s much, much, more. Please go read. Common Room scholars will especially delight in the final sentence, and will be reminded strongly of their Granny Tea. The Headmistress will wait here, quietly hugging herself for sheer joy over finding this article and being able to share it with her friends and relations.

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More than private concern

Read Not Dead at All, by Harriet McBryde Johnson over at Slate:

“Due to a congenital neuromuscular disease, I am having trouble swallowing, and it’s a constant struggle to get by mouth the calories my skinny body needs. For whatever reason, I’m still trying, but I know a tube is in my future. So, possibly, is speechlessness. That’s a scary thought. If I couldn’t speak for myself, would I want to die? If I become uncommunicative, a passive object of other people’s care, should I hope my brain goes soft and leaves me in peace?

My emotional response is powerful, but at bottom it’s not important. It’s no more important than anyone else’s, not what matters. The things that ought to matter have become obscured in our communal clash of gut reactions. Here are 10 of them…”

All ten are worth reading. And don’t miss the conclusion. Here’s a sample:

“I hope against hope that I will never be one of those people in the shadows, that I will always, one way or another, be able to make my wishes known. I hope that I will not outlive my usefulness or my capacity (at least occasionally) to amuse the people around me. But if it happens otherwise, I hope whoever is appointed to speak for me will be subject to legal constraints. Even if my guardian thinks I’d be better off dead—even if I think so myself—I hope to live and die in a world that recognizes that killing, even of people with the most severe disabilities, is a matter of more than private concern. “

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More on Memo Mix-up

Michelle Malkin brings updates.

Powerline has more. Read “ABC Checks Out.” Powerline says to ignore the bad spelling, but we are an educational blog. We suggest our readers eat a peanut M&M; for every spelling error you find in the ABC source’s note.

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Asking Questions

Polipundit is asking some questions today.

The Good Captain covers capriciousness.

Read an affadavit by another doctor, one Doctor William Chesire, with experience with Terri’s case who says that she may not be PVS.

Hugh Hewitt has more about Dr. Chesire and the culture of death behind Terri’s starvation.

Patterico asks another question:

“Do you oppose an attempt to feed her liquid, to see if she can swallow it on her own? If so, why?”

He quotes William Anderson, who points out

“When we awaken from this queasy nightmare, people will ask how it could have been that a court could post a police officer by the bedside to insure that a dying woman succumbed to a ghastly death by thirst.”

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Do as I say, not as I do….

From this Eyewitness News Report:

A state law prohibits smoking within 25 feet of a school. Student Eliazar Velasquez observed somebody violating that law, in fact, actually smoking on school property just outside a door to the school building. He photographed the law-breaker and published the pictures on the web.

He also passed out fliers at the school directing students to the pictures on the internet.

So he was suspended. You see, the school principal was the scoff-law in this case. I think I like this kid.

According to the article:

“Central High administrators say Velasquez’s suspension was because the sophomore had harassed and slandered the principal and was being a disruptive influence.

The American Civil Liberties Union has gotten involved, saying the suspension raises freedom of speech and due-process issues. “

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