Which CM Volume Should You Read First?

CM volume: Miss Mason wrote six books in her series on education. That series is often mistitled the ‘Home Education’ or “Homeschooling Series.” This is not an ideal or accurate description because the books are not really about homeschooling, they are about educating children- at home, in school, in private or public schools, or in night schools for teens who have to work during the day. They are about education and children, period.

Here are the six volumes and their titles (with links to where you can read them online if you like):

Volume 1 – Home Education– written about the education of children from birth to 9
Volume 2 – Parents and Children– stands alone, a collection of articles and essays previously published in various other sources.
Volume 3 – School Education– about the education of children from 9-12
Volume 4 – Ourselves, published in 1904. In it, Miss Mason addressed herself directly to the children, or for parents to read aloud with their children, to help them learn to examine themselves and develop high moral standards and self-control. The first part is for children under age 16. Book two of Ourselves is written for students over 16
Volume 5 – Formation of Character, published in  in 1905, developed from a revision of earlier volumes. Miss Mason explained in the preface to volume 5 (Formation of Character) that “In editing Home Education and Parents and Children for the ‘Home Education’ Series, the introduction of much new matter made it necessary to transfer a considerable part of the contents of those two members of the series to this volume, Some Studies In the Formation of Character.” Her purpose with this volume, she said, was to demonstrate how her methods should assist children to naturally develop and strengthen good character traits, although this may be balanced by her reminder that we must not ‘make character our conscious objective.’
Volume 6 – Towards A Philosophy of Education Miss Mason’s last book, Towards A Philosophy of Education was published in 1923, nearly forty years after her first book.  It is primarily concerned with the education of children and young adults of around 12 and up.  However she also revised her principles in this book, and explained more about her methods and philosophy, revisiting topics covered in previous books.  (some of above information taken from here)

So, which of these should you start with?

I have some suggestions, but keep in mind, I’m not here to tell you a right or a wrong way to do this, because it is my opinion that there really is not a wrong answer, although some choices will make more sense to a new reader than others (i.e. You probably don’t want to begin with 4 or 5 if you’re wanting to find out how the method works).

Most people probably want to begin with volume 1, 3, or 6, as they are about the practical and philosophical application of the principles with specific ages of children. Other than that it doesn’t matter a whole lot where you start.

Yes, I do know there is an article about purporting to be ‘The Truth’ about the alleged folly of starting with volume 6 and why this is WRONG. I read the article, and it was very difficult to take it seriously (word to the wise, a plethora of citations at the end does not prove anything about the quality of the primary document). I will be blunt here.  I am not at all sure that author had actually read all six volumes herself before she wrote that.  My opinion is largely based on a few things within the article.  I am wondering which, if any, she has read from cover to cover, and when she read them.  My curiosity is idle, however, because I see no basis at all for anybody to authoritatively be advising people with such rigidity as to which of the six volumes they should read and in what order.

I do agree with her that the books are interdependent, and you _want_ to read more than one (IF POSSIBLE). It’s ideal to read all of them if at all possible, but I have a lot of sympathy for the overwhelmed mother of 7 who isn’t a speedy reader and who didn’t hear about CM until her kids were already teens because while that is not my story, it’s got quite a few of the same elements.

In the fall of 1987 I was a  mom of 7 (well, 6, one on the way) who considered herself a Charlotte Mason homeschooler, but still had not read all of her books. Er, any of her books. This was because I kept getting tangled in the wool, drains, and open windows of volume 1.  I read For the Children’s Sake in 1988, when my oldest was 5, but I never got beyond the Victoriana cleanliness and health issues of volume 1,  and now my first two kids were teens. I’d read the others, those books *about* Charlotte Mason, in the meantime, and I had been trying to implement Mason’s methods, but there was a lot I didn’t understand, and even more I didn’t even know I didn’t understand.  If somebody had insisted I could not proceed until I finished all six volumes in their numerical order, well, I’m not I would have finished one of them even yet, here in 2017!  So I’ve been there. I know moms don’t need more burdens, especially made up ones.

Homeschooling, mothering, learning about the CM method from scratch (especially if you don’t have a background rich in the classics, poetry, and so on already) is really, really, truly worthwhile. It’s also something that takes time, and it’s not always easy.  Those hard things are so worth doing, I cannot stress this enough. But let’s not make up other burdens that are no part of Mason’s methods and impose them on people who are already treading water. Throw them a lifeline, not an anchor you’ve chosen to drop somewhere Mason herself never did.  If that’s not clear enough,  while I admire the enthusiasm and goal of accuracy, I think it’s nonsense, hurtful nonsense at that, for anybody to propose that somebody else is doing it wrong if they read these books in a different order than the approved 1-6. It bothers me that somebody is putting that kind of a burden on homeschooling moms who are already constantly second guessing themselves about doing everything just right, and it bothers me most because that burden over something that is entirely arbitrary. It’s such a petty place to draw a line between the Charlotte Mason Church of the Perfect People Doing Everything Perfectly Right and everybody else. What matters most is that you read them, and if possible, you read more than one.

IF you can only read one, I still suggest starting with volume 6. Miss Mason herself expected that volume 6 might be the first exposure people had to her methods. She did not assume she was writing volume 6 for only members of the PNEU who had read her other five books. In the preface of that very volume she she says:

“I should like to add that we have no axe to grind. The public good is our aim; and the methods proposed are applicable in any school. My object in offering this volume to the public is to urge upon all who are concerned with education a few salient principles which are generally either unknown or disregarded; and a few methods which, like that bathing in Jordan, are too simple to commend themselves to the ‘general.'”

I do not think she could have spoken more plainly to convey that her expected audience was not only PNEU members- her *goal* in offering *this* volume (which volume? SIX) to whom? To the *general public.* I know I sound like my hair is on fire. It kind of is, because I really grieve for the harried, burdened mothers being given a sack of useless weight and told to carry it, too, when it really is not a hill worth climbing, let alone a hill to die on.

When I first started reading these books to the point where I got past drains and things, it was 17 years ago.  Back then, almost everybody stopped with volume 1.   This was so very true that I once drove a hundred miles to go to much vaunted CM discussion group led by a woman who was writing a book on the CM method- and when I got there, I discovered that most of the people in this study group had never read any of Masons writings, and the lady who was writing the book had stopped at volume one.  I was the only person there who had ever read volume 6.  The group was fairly well known in CM circles at the time, and outside CM circles as well.  I was shocked.

And so a lot of very silly notions crept into the ‘CM’ movement. People thought it did not work in high school, because of course, 15 minutes is not enough for high school math lessons, and teens need some formal grammar and more for science than nature study, for example. I read through volume 6 and learned that Charlotte already knew that. Volume 6 had lots of information that wasn’t in volume 1 because teens and children under 9 do have different needs.

Because I already *had* teens (my first homeschool grad is now 34), I finally *started* with volume 6, and for the first time, I was able to read and keep reading, and then read some more.   I loved how it unfolded the method for me.  It was beautiful, refreshing, enlightening, eye-opening.  I read it again.  And I might have read it again.   I then read the rest backward, sort of- volume 3, volume 1, then 2, 5, and 4. I had tried starting with volume 1 many times and always got bogged down, so if I had continued trying to read them in order, I never would have finished. So I think it was perfect for me to start with volume 6.

A dear friend of mine, who is the smartest (and most gracious) woman I know, read them in order, 1-6 because that’s what you do and she has an orderly, organized brain (and her oldest child is about the same age as my fifth child).  I think she read volume 1 twice before going on to read the rest in steady, chronological order.   That worked brilliantly for her. And both of us benefited and learned from our very different approach, and neither of us is ‘wrong’ to have started where we were.

So where should *you* begin?   My answer would be that first of all, you want to read the six volumes, or one of them, anyway, throw yourself a party and hooray for you!!  Nobody gets anywhere much without goals, so give yourself some credit.  Then consider the following to help you start:
Volume 1 is about educating children 9 and under, (birth-9)- if you have little kids or no kids yet, you probably should start here.

Volume 3 is for those educating kids of 9-12, and if that’s your kids, start there.

Volume 6 is for those educating kids of 12 and up, and if that’s where you are, start there.

After that first one, choose one of the other two education books that fits your circumstances.

Meanwhile, I like to tell people to leave volume 2 in the bathroom or by the nightstand or wherever you sit to the nurse the baby- it’s a collection of stand alone articles that were previously published in newspapers and parents review articles, so it’s good for dipping.

Volume 4 is one she intended students to read themselves, and it’s a beautiful book on self-knowledge. I benefited greatly *myself* from this book. I would read this for myself the same way that I would read Pilgrim’s Progress or Stepping Heavenward. There is much to think about and meditate on.

Volume 5 is about character building, habit training. I really think the ideal way to work through this book is to read the study posts related to it in the AmblesideOnline forum.

That’s my opinion.  You decide.  Nobody is wrong for starting in a different order than anybody else.

I will give you one more tip that really helped me read through these books and a lot of other harder ones- set yourself a goal- it does not matter so much what it is, just choose a number- five pages, three, ten (I chose 25, because I read fast)- and determine that you will read through that many pages every day before you read anything else (besides your Bible, of course). If you have to miss a day, or even five, that is okay, but you can’t read anything else until you’ve made it up and read through your assigned pages for the week. It’s okay to decide on two a day and then read ten over the weekend instead.  The main point is to pick a number and stick to it. You will find it gets easier and easier to meet your goal, and you will find yourself closer to finishing the books you start than you ever have before.

To read these books on your Kindle for free, go to fivefilters.org, click on ‘push to kindle.’  Make sure you know your kindle email address (the one used to send documents to your kindle).  Get the link to one of the six volumes (scroll up) and plug it into the box and push send.  Voila!!  You have a free, annotated version of one of the six volumes!

 

Enjoy.  Feast your soul.  Read steadily, think carefully.  Ponder while powdering your nose or the baby’s bottom.  review a few ideas as you drift off to sleep or while cutting vegetables.  Be blessed- not stressed.

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Birth control pills and fish

This is kind of…. freakish. Fish becoming transgender because of contraceptive pill hormones flushed into the ecosystem…

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/02/fish-becoming-transgender-contraceptive-pill-chemicals-flushed/

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Ancient Historians by Michael Grant, Reading Schedule

These are not lesson plans, but rather a very loosely organized reading schedule. I would spend at least a week on each assigned reading- reading a few pages a day. Two weeks is probably better. If you take a week per assignment, you’ll be done in 24 weeks or so, but very likely your student will be burned out. If you take two weeks, you’ll get through it in under a year. Those estimates are assuming a consistant pace of one or two weeks through each numbered reading assignment, but they are not all equal. One section might have a student reading 20 pages, and another only 10, so you may want to vary the length of time you give for readings as well.

I did not assign the entire book. As I recall, the first two thirs are more about specific historians and their writings, and the last section is biographical or literary criticism and more polemic in nature. But it’s been a long time, and the book is in the states and I am here in the Philippines cleaning out old computer files in a very piecemeal fashion.

Reading, narrating, and some timeline work is the basic plan. You might also choose one of these narrations for your student o rewrite in more detail, fleshing it out into an article of his own. You could vary the narration styles, asking for a chapter outline, a list of details, a written test the student devises for you to take, but the reading, narrating, and timeline are going to be the most important parts.

I would assign this to students probably 16 and up, although advanced students might begin at 15. If you wanted to list it in a transcript, it could be Ancient History, obviously. If you beef up some of the writing assignments it could be a literature or writing course as well.

Here’s how Barnes and Nobles describes the book:
If Greece and Rome are held to be the cradles of Western civilization, this is in part due to the fact that they are the cradles of written history. Between 500 B.C. and 500 A.D. men such as Herodotus, Thucydides and Tacitus virtually invented the discipline of history as we know it. To these men history was a dual art

the art of recording the truth as accurately as possible and the art of writing as lucidly as the great men of letters.

This text offers an examination of the primary chroniclers of the ancient world. Beginning with Herodotus and Thucydides and their very different approaches to narration, the book discusses the works and methods of the founders of the historical discipline.

THe Ancient Historians, by Michael Grant

  1. Intro, Before Herodotus, pages 3-22
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  2. Herodotus:- The Life and Work of, 23-37
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  3. Herodotus: The background and Beliefs of, 38-56
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  4. Herodotus: Methods of, 57-69
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  5. Part 2. Thucydides: Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War, 69-87
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  6. Speeches and personalities in, 88-101
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  7. Power and Politics in, 102-113
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  8. Methods of, 114-124
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  9. Part 3, The Later Greeks: Xenophon, 125-136  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  10. The dramatic historians, 136-141
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  11. Polybius, 144-167
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  12. Part 4 latin writers of the republic: Cato the censor and after, 167-180  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  13. Caesar, 181-194
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  14. Sallust, 195-216
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  15. Part 5, the two faces of empire: Llivy, 217-242  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  16. Josephus, 243-270
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  17. Part 6 Tacitus
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  18. Tacitus and the empire,, 271
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  19. Anarchy and humanity in Tacitus, 300
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  20. Part 7, greek and latin biographers: Plutarch, 309-328: Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  21. Suetonius, 329
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  22. Part 8 christian and pagan: Eusebius, 343, Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  23. Ammianus, 358
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
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Mainspring of Human Progress Course Reading, Study Guide and Schedule

Books or activities:

  • The Mainstream of Human Progress– the primary text.  The page numbers I share may not match the page-numbers in your edition.  Basically, just read about one chapter per week.
  • Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week.   You may choose another biography of Frederick the Great. (Younger students may enjoy this Henty book on the Seven Years War, but it’s not a history book).
  • Student will keep a scrapbook of articles which illustrate concepts in the readings. The scrapbook may be online or in a real book.
  • The Wool-Pack (begins in week 7) (optional, but really fun read)
  • What Went Wrong by Bernard Lewis (optional)
  • The movie Longitude, with Jeremy Irons and Gemma Jones (week 14 or 15) (optional, alternatives are Lost at Sea, the Search for Longitude, or The Longitude Prize book by Dava Sobel, which would be read spread out over the school year).
  • Access to dictionary and encyclopedia, online or hard copy.
  • Primary government documents: Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the US, The Magna Charta
  • timeline, century book, and map-work as usual in a Charlotte Mason course of study.

At the conclusion, consider this worth at least a high school credit in history, economics, and/or world government.

Week One:

  • Day 1: Read the ‘the author and his book’ section and either tell me what you remember, or write it in a paragraph.  If you don’t know them already, look up these words in the dictionary: Mainspring, polemicist, paean, materialist, ingenuity, exemplar, capitalism.   Either tell me what they mean, or write down their definitions and use each word in a sentence.
  • Day 2: Look up Karl Marx and Adam Smith (encyclopedia, infogalactic.com or wikipedia.com, and tell me something about who they were (or write it down if you prefer).
  • Day 3: Read the introduction, pages ix to xx, and as you read make a list of movie titles mentioned. When you finish reading, narrate.
  • Days 4 and 5, read pages in your other books (Evening in the Palace of Reason, Short History of Prussia, or another  biography of Frederick the Great)
  • Weekend: Watch one or two of the movies mentioned, and review it (in writing or orally), include your observations of how businessmen are portrayed.

Week 2

  •  If you don’t already know them, look up initiative and monopoly in the dictionary. Write down a definition in your own words or tell me what they mean.
  • Read chapter 1  Narrate orally or in writing.
  •  Write or tell me the answers to these questions: 1. What does it take for a natural resource to be useful? 2. How do freedom and responsibility go together?  How do authority and responsibility go together  (you’ll have to think about this one, I don’t think it was answered in the book, at least not directly)?
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.

Week 3

  • Look up tenacity and inducement in the dictionary, unless you already know them (tell me what they mean). Write a definition in your own words on an index card you use to bookmark the book.
  • Read chapter 2 and narrate it aloud or in writing.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.

Week 4

  • Tell me the meanings of the following words, or look them up in a dictionary if you need to: network, equitable, coercion, despot, rationalization, write a definition for each of them in your own words.
  • Read chapter 3- narrate
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.

Week 5

  • Look up automatons in the dictionary and write a definition in your own words. Read chapter 4, The Pagan View, narrate.
  • This week look at the newspaper every day and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook. Continue to do this every week.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.

Week 6

  • Dictionary: socialism, attrition, foment, collectivism, proletariat, write down definitions.
  • Read chapter 5, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 7:

  • Look up these words in the dictionary: Demoralize, degenerate, pernicious, fascism communism. Write your own definition and use the words in a sentence.
  • Read chapter 6. Write a test on this chapter, with five questions.  You will give the test to me to take and then you will score it.
  • Dictionary: fallacious, degradation, ascetic, economic, monopoly,  tyrant, aristocrat
  • Encyclopedia: Magna Charta- write these words down along with a definition or explanation.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 8

  • Read 4 chapters in the book The Wool Pack (one each day), narrating each reading.
  • Read chapter seven of the Mainstream of Human Progress, page 58 to 63- write down ten key points
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.
  • .

Week 9

  • Read four more chapters of The Wool Pack, Narrate, and tell me why I had you read this book now.
  • Finish chapter seven of Mainstream, writing down ten more key points.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 10

  • Read four more chapters of The Wool-Pack
  • Look up Abraham and Terah in the concordance of your Bible. Read the story very carefully.  Write down a list of 20 things one could learn from this story.
  • Read the first two pages of chapter eight, explain why the author believes Abraham’s theologocial concept of monotheism laid the foundation for science.
  • Read to page 76,  narrate (What’s wrong with this? Is the first commandment REALLY about recognizing your OWN worth?)
  • Complete chapter eight. Do you agree or disagree with his points?  Why or why not?
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 11

  • Read the Declaration of Independence.
  • Read the Constitution and the first ten amendments.
  • Dictionary: define democracy, republic, authoritarian, equitable, axiom, feudal,
  • Read page 81-88 of Mainstream, narrate.
  • Read Our Island Story, the chapter on the Magna Charta, for review.  Narrate.
  • Read pages 88-92 of Mainstream. narrate.
  • Read four more chapters of The Wool-pack. Narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 12

  • For chapter ten, you are going to keep a timeline of events listed in the chapter, so get out a couple pieces of paper, turn them sideways (landscape orientation), and draw a horizontal line across the middle from left to right. Label the beginning 570, and the end 1215. Use a ruler and mark the inches, and at every inch add another 30 years (570AD, 600 AD, 630 AD, on the timeline.  Read pages 93, 94 and put the main character at the beginning of your timeline.
  • Read pages 94-99, narrate
  • Read pages 99-104, narrate
  • Read more in the Wool-pack (and go ahead and read more every week, narrating afterward, until done.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.

Week 13

Week 14

Week 15

  • Read to page 139 in Mainstream. Find locations on map. Narrate.
  • Finish chapter, find places on map, narrate.
  • Watch The Longitude Prize
  • Look up: eleemosynary, utopia.
  • Read pages 143-153, Narrate
  • Finish chapter.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 16

  • Chapter 13; Look up blockade, smuggling, prohibition, read to page 164, narrate.
  • Look up Despot, read from page 165-169
  • Read to end of chapter (page 175).   Add something to timeline from reading.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.
  • Wool-Pack

Week 17

  • Chapter 14, read to page 179, narrate.
  • Read to page 182, narrate.
  • Read 182 to 185, narrate.
  • Finish chapter, narrate.
  • Add something or somebody to your timeline.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 18

 

  • Read chapter 15, summarize each section in just one or two sentences (hint: the bold headers should help)
  • Read  a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 19

  • Chapter 16: Look up decentralized, grassroots, astroturfing,
  • Read first section, narrate
  • Read second section, narrate
  • Read third section, narrate
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 20

  • Chapter 17, look up mercenary.   Narrate.  Find places on map.  Add events or people to timeline.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 21

  • Read to page 216 of chapter 18, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Read to page 225, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Read to end of chapter, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Add people, or events to timeline and find places on map.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 22

  • Read to page 240 of chapter 19, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Read to page 246, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Finish chapter, summarizing each section with a sentence or two.
  • Add people, or events to timeline and find places on map.
  • Read half a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 23

  • Read chapter 20, summarizing each section in a sentence or two.
  • Add people, or events to timeline and find places on map.
  • Read a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Week 24

  • Read Chapter 21, narrate.
  • Write a book review of this book- one or two paragraphs telling somebody else what they can expect to learn about from reading this book, how well written it is or is not, good things about it, and not so good things about it.
  • Read a chapter of What Went Wrong, narrate.
  • READ: Evening in the Palace of Reason (for 16 and up) Read 16 or 17 pages per week.   OR A Short HIstory of Prussia, by John Abbot, read about 13 pages a week OR another related book of your choice.  Narrate.
  •  Look at the news and find articles that illustrate concepts in this, or any previous chapters and put them in a scrapbook.
  • Look up any relevant places on a map.  Add to your timeline.
  • Wool-pack?

Continue reading (at a regular, steady pace)  and narrating any of the above books until they have been completed.

When all the books are completed, the student may write a book-review of each one, or the parent may ask the student to answer an essay question of the parent’s choice for each one.

 

You may use this for your own personal use. You may not republish it in any form.  If you do use it, I’d love to hear how it worked for you, and if you find the perfect Biography or other supplemental book to go with this course, please let me know.

Posted in education, homeschooling | Tagged , , | 5 Responses

Extra help with school work

This site has links to several websites which offer tutorials and tests for math and language arts.  IT’s hosted by a community college, and the goal is to help students study for the accuplacer, but since many, many high school graduates are not even up to par on high school level skills in these areas, they tend to start lower- or at least have that option. (one of the math sites, for example, begins by reviewing some long division short cuts and how to find prime numbers)  Bookmark it for use later, whenever you need help teaching your kids some of the basics.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Response


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