Virtue, Friendship, and Love

The heart is an organ that can expand to hold the world. The more love it contains, the greater its capacity for containing extra supplies.
…there is something especially fetching about the comradeship between men and women geniuses. Ours is a carnal time, with every relationship suspect or explained away by psychiatry. It restores the spirit to learn that there can be friendships where nothing is asked and everything given; where innocence flourishes as if there had never been a Fall.

Saint-Watching, by Phyllis McGinley

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Virtue, Friendship, and Love

The heart is an organ that can expand to hold the world. The more love it contains, the greater its capacity for containing extra supplies.
…there is something especially fetching about the comradeship between men and women geniuses. Ours is a carnal time, with every relationship suspect or explained away by psychiatry. It restores the spirit to learn that there can be friendships where nothing is asked and everything given; where innocence flourishes as if there had never been a Fall.

Saint-Watching, by Phyllis McGinley

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Twaddle

All of us read what Charlotte Mason called twaddle. She also called it ‘reading made easy,’ and she was not a fan of lazy, desultory reading. Personally, I do not think I will successfully manage to ‘never’ make a place for reading made easy for my children or myself, as Charlotte advocates. That does not mean I don’t try to improve at all, though. My children do not need much help to develop an affinity for easy books or the other trappings of pop culture. These things are pop culture because they are already completely accessible.

I can do them the favor, as a friend put it once, of ‘introducing them early to the pleasures of reading things that are a little “hard”. Then they will not always be satisified by light reading, but will have that hunger awakened within them that seeks for real “mind food”.’

One of our goals in our home and homeschool is to so fill my children’s hearts and minds with a rich and wonderful variety of literature- the sort that sparks the moral imagination and sets it aflame with a bright and merry blaze- that the secondrate, damp and mouldy twaddle out there just won’t satisfy, or at the least, will quickly pall.

Posted in Charlotte Mason | 2 Comments

Cheese Moons

Cheese Moons

1 3/4 cups grated cheddar cheese (I prefer sharp)
1 cup flour (I prefer freshly ground whole wheat)
five tablespoons margerine or butter (butter is better)
cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
Grease and lightly dust with flour a cookie sheet.
Grate cheese. Slice the butter in several small pieces.

Food Processor directions: Put grated cheese, diced butter, and flour in a food processor that has blades down in the bowl of the processor. Process with the metal blade for about 30 seconds, until a fairly smooth dough is formed.

No Food Processor directions: Grate the cheese and allow it to sit at room temperature, getting somewhat soft. Put the flour and butter in a bowl. Cut the butter into the flour as for biscuits or pie crust (i.e. use a pastry cutter, or take the butter and flour up between your clean hands and rub it between your hands, allowing the butter coated flour particles to fall down into the bowl, scoop up a good sized handful of flour and butter and repeat until the fat is thoroughly mixed in with the flour. Add the cheese and mix will with a fork, then squeeze it into dough using your hands.

Dust your hands lightly with flour. For each cookie take about two tablespoons of dough and form into a patty about 1/8th inch thick. Cut with a crescent moon shaped cookie cutter (or cut into crecents with a knife, or use a round cookie cutter and then cut the round moon into a crescent- or have full moons).

Place each moon on the cookie sheet. Create many moons this way, using up all the dough. Dust each moon with cinnamon (or sprinkle with a cinnamon and sugar mixture) and bake for about 10 minutes, or until lightly brown at the tips of the crescent let cool on a sheet.

Serve these to your children with tea, pickled onions and poetry.

Lady Moon
by Richard Monckton Milnes

“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving?”
“Over the sea.”
“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving?”
“All that love me.”

“Are you not tired with rolling and never
Resting to sleep?
Why look so pale and so sad, as for ever
Wishing to weep?”

“Ask me not this, little child, if you love me;
You are too bold.
I must obey my dear Father above me,
And do as I’m told.”

“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving?”
“Over the sea.”
“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving?”
“All that love me.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Fields O’er Which the Reaper’s Hand has Passed
Henry David Thoreau

On fields o’er which the reaper’s hand has pass’d
Lit by the harvest moon and autumn sun,
My thoughts like stubble floating in the wind
And of such fineness as October airs,
There after harvest could I glean my life
A richer harvest reaping without toil,
And weaving gorgeous fancies at my will
In subtler webs than finest summer haze.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Silver

Slowly, silently, now the moon
Walks the night in her silver shoon;
This way, and that, she peers, and sees
Silver fruit upon silver trees;
One by one the casements catch
Her beams beneath the silvery thatch;
Couched in his kennel, like a log,
With paws of silver sleeps the dog;
From their shadowy coat the white breasts peep
Of doves in a silver-feathered sleep;
A harvest mouse goes scampering by,
With silver claws, and silver eye;
And moveless fish in the water gleam,
By silver reeds in a silver stream.

- Walter de la Mare

reposted in The Common Kitchen

Posted in cookery | 4 Comments

Rita and Houston sites to Watch

I’m going to be getting most of my news via the radio most of tomorrow.

Below are some sites to help keep you up to date on Rita. This monster is not a category 5:
Houston Chronicle

A Certain Slant of Light- beautiful blog; she’s been in my blogroll for some time.

Blog Houston

Blogs of War

Michelle Malkin has a nice collection of blogs and quotes.

Basically, Rita is mad, bad, and dangerous to know, and if you can get out, go. Now.

One of the above bloggers (sorry, forget which one) commented that the stores in Houston were running out of supplies. Another reasons why it’s important to keep a good stock of emergency supplies on hand so that when a hurricane is on the way you don’t have to run to the grocery store before you can get out of town.

Update: the ‘not’ in the amended sentence above truly was a mistake. I intended to write Rita is a cat 5, but allowed my fingers to type without my mental input. Apologies.

P.S. look at Michelle Malkin’s page just for the photographs. Veddy Interesting.

Update again: Generation Why is another good Texas blog- funny guy!

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The Comfort of Hymns

A Houston family preparing to evacuate shared with several friends via email that the family had been playing “Be Still My Soul” over and over again while packing and preparing their home. Particularly comforting:

“Be still, my soul;
the waves and winds still know
His voice who ruled them while He dwelt below.”

Entire lyrics and some music posted previously here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Twaddle

All of us read what Charlotte Mason called twaddle. She also called it ‘reading made easy,’ and she was not a fan of lazy, desultory reading. Personally, I do not think I will successfully manage to ‘never’ make a place for reading made easy for my children or myself, as Charlotte advocates. That does not mean I don’t try to improve at all, though. My children do not need much help to develop an affinity for easy books or the other trappings of pop culture. These things are pop culture because they are already completely accessible.

I can do them the favor, as a friend put it once, of ‘introducing them early to the pleasures of reading things that are a little “hard”. Then they will not always be satisified by light reading, but will have that hunger awakened within them that seeks for real “mind food”.’

One of our goals in our home and homeschool is to so fill my children’s hearts and minds with a rich and wonderful variety of literature- the sort that sparks the moral imagination and sets it aflame with a bright and merry blaze- that the secondrate, damp and mouldy twaddle out there just won’t satisfy, or at the least, will quickly pall.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Cheese Moons

Cheese Moons

1 3/4 cups grated cheddar cheese (I prefer sharp)
1 cup flour (I prefer freshly ground whole wheat)
five tablespoons margerine or butter (butter is better)
cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
Grease and lightly dust with flour a cookie sheet.
Grate cheese. Slice the butter in several small pieces.

Food Processor directions: Put grated cheese, diced butter, and flour in a food processor that has blades down in the bowl of the processor. Process with the metal blade for about 30 seconds, until a fairly smooth dough is formed.

No Food Processor directions: Grate the cheese and allow it to sit at room temperature, getting somewhat soft. Put the flour and butter in a bowl. Cut the butter into the flour as for biscuits or pie crust (i.e. use a pastry cutter, or take the butter and flour up between your clean hands and rub it between your hands, allowing the butter coated flour particles to fall down into the bowl, scoop up a good sized handful of flour and butter and repeat until the fat is thoroughly mixed in with the flour. Add the cheese and mix will with a fork, then squeeze it into dough using your hands.

Dust your hands lightly with flour. For each cookie take about two tablespoons of dough and form into a patty about 1/8th inch thick. Cut with a crescent moon shaped cookie cutter (or cut into crecents with a knife, or use a round cookie cutter and then cut the round moon into a crescent- or have full moons).

Place each moon on the cookie sheet. Create many moons this way, using up all the dough. Dust each moon with cinnamon (or sprinkle with a cinnamon and sugar mixture) and bake for about 10 minutes, or until lightly brown at the tips of the crescent let cool on a sheet.

Serve these to your children with tea, pickled onions and poetry.

Lady Moon
by Richard Monckton Milnes

“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving?”
“Over the sea.”
“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving?”
“All that love me.”

“Are you not tired with rolling and never
Resting to sleep?
Why look so pale and so sad, as for ever
Wishing to weep?”

“Ask me not this, little child, if you love me;
You are too bold.
I must obey my dear Father above me,
And do as I’m told.”

“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving?”
“Over the sea.”
“Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving?”
“All that love me.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Fields O’er Which the Reaper’s Hand has Passed
Henry David Thoreau

On fields o’er which the reaper’s hand has pass’d
Lit by the harvest moon and autumn sun,
My thoughts like stubble floating in the wind
And of such fineness as October airs,
There after harvest could I glean my life
A richer harvest reaping without toil,
And weaving gorgeous fancies at my will
In subtler webs than finest summer haze.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Silver

Slowly, silently, now the moon
Walks the night in her silver shoon;
This way, and that, she peers, and sees
Silver fruit upon silver trees;
One by one the casements catch
Her beams beneath the silvery thatch;
Couched in his kennel, like a log,
With paws of silver sleeps the dog;
From their shadowy coat the white breasts peep
Of doves in a silver-feathered sleep;
A harvest mouse goes scampering by,
With silver claws, and silver eye;
And moveless fish in the water gleam,
By silver reeds in a silver stream.

- Walter de la Mare

reposted in The Common Kitchen

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Rita and Houston sites to Watch

I’m going to be getting most of my news via the radio most of tomorrow.

Below are some sites to help keep you up to date on Rita. This monster is not a category 5:
Houston Chronicle

A Certain Slant of Light- beautiful blog; she’s been in my blogroll for some time.

Blog Houston

Blogs of War

Michelle Malkin has a nice collection of blogs and quotes.

Basically, Rita is mad, bad, and dangerous to know, and if you can get out, go. Now.

One of the above bloggers (sorry, forget which one) commented that the stores in Houston were running out of supplies. Another reasons why it’s important to keep a good stock of emergency supplies on hand so that when a hurricane is on the way you don’t have to run to the grocery store before you can get out of town.

Update: the ‘not’ in the amended sentence above truly was a mistake. I intended to write Rita is a cat 5, but allowed my fingers to type without my mental input. Apologies.

P.S. look at Michelle Malkin’s page just for the photographs. Veddy Interesting.

Update again: Generation Why is another good Texas blog- funny guy!

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The Comfort of Hymns

A Houston family preparing to evacuate shared with several friends via email that the family had been playing “Be Still My Soul” over and over again while packing and preparing their home. Particularly comforting:

“Be still, my soul;
the waves and winds still know
His voice who ruled them while He dwelt below.”

Entire lyrics and some music posted previously here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment