But It’s All President Bush’s Fault

From the Washington Post: Nagin was telling tourists that he hoped they had a hotel room at least three floors up, because unless they were able to do the impossible and find a rental car to get out of town, they were stuck with riding the storm out in their hotel rooms, but

“In fact, while the last regularly scheduled train out of town had left a few hours earlier, Amtrak had decided to run a “dead-head” train that evening to move equipment out of the city. It was headed for high ground in Macomb, Miss., and it had room for several hundred passengers. “We offered the city the opportunity to take evacuees out of harm’s way,” said Amtrak spokesman Cliff Black. “The city declined.”

So the ghost train left New Orleans at 8:30 p.m., with no passengers on board.”

Speaking of ignoring mass transit options, the Political Teen has the video footage of LA Senator Mary Landrieu’s appearance on Fox News Sunday, where she sidestepped clumsily and refused to answer Chris Wallace’s question about the buses Mayor Nagin left sitting in the parking lots instead of using them to evacuate his people. She says that it’s not his fault because he ‘can’t get his people to work on a sunny day, less alone getting them out of a city in front of a hurricane” and this is President Bush’s fault because he doesn’t believe in mass transit. Really. And Nagin couldn’t use those buses because they were under water. Which was kind of the point. Why were they under water instead of on dry ground after being used to evacuate the people who had no transportation?
She lamblasts the federal government response and then when asked why her criticism does not apply to the local and state governments (and given cause why it does), she pulls back and says she is not going to cast blame, this is no time for finger pointing, and she calls on the Federal Government to stop issuing press releases blaming state and city officials, and to work productively with her and drop the blame game, and then continues in the same breath to blame the Federal government. Nobody mentions that her brother is the Lt. Governor of Louisiana.
You really want to watch this.

Paul at Wizbang is ranting eloquently about the need for more ownership, not less, and less government intervention, not more. Paul is from New Orleans and evacuated out in advance of the storm. Language Warning. Here’s a bowdlerized excerpt:

The answer isn’t to make poor people more dependent, the answer is to make the poor people more self sufficient! (Amazing I know)

The Democrats don’t want an “ownership society.” Well, guess what? Car ownership made the difference in how some people survived!

Let’s call it like it was… 85% of the people you saw trapped in the Superdome lived in government housing and have for several generations…. Their subsistence is dependent on a getting a government check every month. These people have been taught -by Democrats- that property ownership is overrated… That big government will protect them. [bleep]

This was brought home by an interview I saw on CNN with a woman airlifted from the Dome to the airport. She was whining that there was a big truck full of water at the airport but the government did not sent enough people to pass the water out. The thought never occurred to her to gather up 2 or 3 people and go see if they could set up a table passing out water to their fellow refugees. She was just sitting in a chair waiting for someone to give her something. She didn’t see herself as someone who could change her position in life, she saw herself as a victim. If I were in her position, I’d get some help, find out who was in charge and get the supplies moving. I wouldn’t be a victim, I’d instantly become a volunteer. But I’m a horrible white republican male business owner who -you know- likes to own things.

…It wasn’t race or even so much economic status that made the difference in how people got thru the storm… it was attitude and ability.

The people who took it upon themselves to act got thru this storm (just as they get thru life) easier than the people waiting for government to help them. So what do the Democrats want? Less people “elevating individualism and private enterprise” and more people depending on government… Amazing. Simply freaking amazing.”

Naturally, his comments have generated a lot of criticism in his comment section. Several people point out that he’s overlooking the disabled poor, those who are ‘undereducated,’ those who are elderly, frail, and lack the mental capacity to make good decisions. Of course, ‘undereducation’ is something most conservatives believe would be best fixed by more local and less federal control, but I would agree that in his passionate post Paul has perhaps simplified the plight of some of the poorest. But I think those people are also best helped on a person to person basis, rather than through a federal bureaucracy. Federal intervention creates a dependency that personal connections do not. No matter what the reasons for their inaction, inability or unwillingness, it remains true that those ‘who took it upon themselves to act’ got through this disaster better than those who waited to see what was going to happen to them.

If you haven’t read these posts by Captain Ed, you need to: FEMA Response is not the issue; and more on how Louisiana failed to follow its own plan.

And finally, Jeff Goldstein has a blog I don’t think I’ve linked to because it’s almost never suitable for the young maidens of the Common Room- but this post is clean, it’s clear, it’s scathing, and it’s good reading. Do not, however, read the comments unless you do not mind foul language.

UPDATE: If you’ve not yet watched the Landrieu appearance via the Political Teen, please do so. Most of our progeny just watched it, and I was amused that the FYG, aged 9, observed, “She doesn’t answer any questions, does she?” FYG also wanted to know why she said “I’ll tell you if you’ll just let me answer this question,” when she wasn’t really answering any questions in the first place.
One of the Maidens watched and said “Beauty is deceptive, because she’s very cute, but she’s not very good.”
Everybody’s eyes opened very wide at her statement that Mayor Nagin can’t get his people to work on a sunny day, less alone get them out in front of a hurricane. Young Pip noted that while Landrieu complained about the government’s ‘insulting’ response to Louisiana’s need for aid, actually, her ‘his people won’t work on a sunny day’ remark (which she repeated three times) is truly one of the most insulting comments we have yet to see from the Katrina reporting.
And the Head Girl is incensed at Landrieu’s double standards.

UPDATE 2: Since this is a family blog, I thought I’d share this
Nursery Rhyme Medley
A tisket, a tasket
Several idiots in a basket
They wrote their own disaster plan
But-while-running-around-like-hens-with-their-heads-cut-off-they-completely-and totally-dropped-the-ball
they dropped it, they dropped it.
And the President’s horses and the president’s men actually *did* pick them up and put them together again- not that Senator Landrieu or the old media will ever notice.

—————————————–

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Bright Children

Once, when I was babysitting a few generally very well behaved children, the oldest child & I ran into a bit of trouble. He did not like how I was managing his affairs and chose to inform me of this in an unacceptable manner. This resulted in his being sent to his bedroom (upstairs) until he could calm down and behave in a pleasant manner.

I came upstairs after a bit to check on him and found him still grumpy. “Well, when you’re ready to be pleasant you can come down,” I said and then turned to leave. He checked me, though.

“I have an idea,” he said in a cool voice.

“You do?” said I in a tentative voice.

“Yes,” he continued in that cool manner, “Why don’t you stay upstairs and I’ll go downstairs? That’s my idea.”

For some odd reason I didn’t concur with his idea. Poor dear.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Sunday Hymn Post- O God Our Help

Our God, Our Help in Ages Past

Our God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast,
And our eternal home.

Beneath the shadow of Thy throne
Thy saints have dwelt secure;
Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
And our defense is sure.

Before the hills in order stood,
Or earth received her frame,
From everlasting Thou art God,
To endless years the same.

A thousand ages in Thy sight
Are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
Before the rising sun.

Time, like an ever rolling stream,
Bears all its sons away;
They are forgotten as a dream
Dies at the opening day.

Our God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while life shall last,
And our eternal home.

Words: Isaac Watts, The Psalms of Da­vid, 1719.

Music: “St. Anne,” Will­iam Croft, 1708

LInk takes you to Cyberhymnal version

Thanks to JDavidB for the suggestion.

Posted in Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs | Leave a comment

Sunday Hymn Post- O God Our Help

Our God, Our Help in Ages Past

Our God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast,
And our eternal home.

Beneath the shadow of Thy throne
Thy saints have dwelt secure;
Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
And our defense is sure.

Before the hills in order stood,
Or earth received her frame,
From everlasting Thou art God,
To endless years the same.

A thousand ages in Thy sight
Are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
Before the rising sun.

Time, like an ever rolling stream,
Bears all its sons away;
They are forgotten as a dream
Dies at the opening day.

Our God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while life shall last,
And our eternal home.

Words: Isaac Watts, The Psalms of Da­vid, 1719.

Music: “St. Anne,” Will­iam Croft, 1708

LInk takes you to Cyberhymnal version

Thanks to JDavidB for the suggestion.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learning Mothering From Books

A friend of my two oldest girls recently asked them if I was like Mrs. Austin in Madeline L’Engle’s books. She said that she thought that it would take a mother like Mrs. Austin to produce girls like my girls.
When the Head Girl passed that on to me I laughed and said, “I wish.” But the truth is that I was secretly terribly pleased because Mrs. Austin is one of my mothering mentors. I read Little Women and tried to be Marmee, but I just couldn’t manage it at all. The mother in Five Little Peppers and How They Grew just wasn’t me. And the mother in Mother Carey’s Chickens utterly defeated me.
But I thought I could manage Mrs. Austin. The Austin family includes music, art, and family read alouds in their daily discussions. So have we. They like philosophical discussions, as do we, and the siblings genuinely love and respect each other- as do ours. The Headmaster and I have never thought sibling ugliness was untreatable. Our expectations have been high, and generally the children have risen to the occasion to meet or even surpassed them. The Austin family has good food and good conversation, and I think we do, too- most of the time.

Mrs. Austin read aloud and sang to her children every night. She sat in a chair in the hall where all the children (she and her husband have five) could hear from their bedrooms. I’ve actually arranged the bedrooms and furniture in some of our houses to accomodate this, too, although I haven’t been consistant about doing it. I got a lot of good ideas from Mrs. Austin, but I have never measured up to the picture of a good mother that I carry with me in my head.

A day or two after the Head Girl told me what her friend had said I told her that actually, while I had not tried to be Mrs. Austin, I had tried to incorporate many of her ideas into our daily lives. Unfortunately, I told her, I am too flawed to have done a good job and I failed at being as good a mother as Mrs. Austin is.

The Head Girl laughed at me kindly and said, “Of course not, Mother. She’s a fictional character.”

How did she get to be so smart?

I do think it’s important not to get too bogged down by the failures, but it’s also important to carry that perfect picture in our heads so that we know what we are aiming towards.

Posted in Charlotte Mason | 2 Comments

Learning Mothering From Books

A friend of my two oldest girls recently asked them if I was like Mrs. Austin in Madeline L’Engle’s books. She said that she thought that it would take a mother like Mrs. Austin to produce girls like my girls.
When the Head Girl passed that on to me I laughed and said, “I wish.” But the truth is that I was secretly terribly pleased because Mrs. Austin is one of my mothering mentors. I read Little Women and tried to be Marmee, but I just couldn’t manage it at all. The mother in Five Little Peppers and How They Grew just wasn’t me. And the mother in Mother Carey’s Chickens utterly defeated me.
But I thought I could manage Mrs. Austin. The Austin family includes music, art, and family read alouds in their daily discussions. So have we. They like philosophical discussions, as do we, and the siblings genuinely love and respect each other- as do ours. The Headmaster and I have never thought sibling ugliness was untreatable. Our expectations have been high, and generally the children have risen to the occasion to meet or even surpassed them. The Austin family has good food and good conversation, and I think we do, too- most of the time.

Mrs. Austin read aloud and sang to her children every night. She sat in a chair in the hall where all the children (she and her husband have five) could hear from their bedrooms. I’ve actually arranged the bedrooms and furniture in some of our houses to accomodate this, too, although I haven’t been consistant about doing it. I got a lot of good ideas from Mrs. Austin, but I have never measured up to the picture of a good mother that I carry with me in my head.

A day or two after the Head Girl told me what her friend had said I told her that actually, while I had not tried to be Mrs. Austin, I had tried to incorporate many of her ideas into our daily lives. Unfortunately, I told her, I am too flawed to have done a good job and I failed at being as good a mother as Mrs. Austin is.

The Head Girl laughed at me kindly and said, “Of course not, Mother. She’s a fictional character.”

How did she get to be so smart?

I do think it’s important not to get too bogged down by the failures, but it’s also important to carry that perfect picture in our heads so that we know what we are aiming towards.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

That Sealed Exit from New Orleans…

From the New York Times comes more on this disturbing story of refugees refused permission to leave the city:

“Police officers refused to allow pedestrians to leave New Orleans, shot guns over their heads, and stole their food and water.

“The police kept saying, ‘We don’t want another Superdome,’ and ‘This isn’t New Orleans,’ ” said Larry Bradshaw, a San Francisco paramedic who was among those fleeing.

Arthur Lawson, chief of the Gretna, La., Police Department [DHM: a Democrat, in case anybody wonders], confirmed that his officers, along with those from the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office and the Crescent City Connection Police, sealed the bridge.

“There was no place for them to come on our side,” Mr. Lawson said.

He said that he had been asked by reporters about officers threatening victims with guns or shooting over their heads, but he said that he had not yet asked his officers about that.

“As soon as things calm down, we will do an inquiry and find out what happened,” he said.

…Officials in Lafayette, La., reported seeing scores of cruisers from the New Orleans police department in their city in the week after the hurricane. Some evacuees who fled to the Superdome and the convention center say that many police officers refused to patrol those structures after dark.

“It’s unbelievable what the police officers did; they just left us,” said Harold Veasey, a 66-year-old New Orleans resident who spent two horrific days at the convention center. And in the week after the hurricane, there were persistent rumors in and around New Orleans that police officers in suburban areas refused to help the storm victims.

Mr. Bradshaw and his partner, Lorrie Beth Slonsky, wrote an account about their experiences that has been widely circulated by e-mail and was first printed in The Socialist Worker.

Cathey Golden, a 51-year-old from Boston, and her 13-year-old son, Ramon Golden, yesterday confirmed the account.

The four met at the Hotel Monteleone in the French Quarter. Mr. Bradshaw and Ms. Slonsky had attended a convention for emergency medicine specialists. Ms. Golden and her two children, including 23-year-old Rashida Golden, were there to visit family.

The hotel allowed its guests and nearly 250 residents from the nearby neighborhood to stay until Thursday, Sept 1. With its food exhausted, the hotel’s manager finally instructed people to leave. Hotel staff handed out maps to show the way to the city’s convention center, to which thousands of other evacuees had fled.

A group of nearly 200 guests gathered to make their way to the center together, the four said. But on the way, they heard that the convention center had become a dangerous, unsanitary pit from which no one was being evacuated. So they stopped in front of a New Orleans police command post near the Harrah’s casino on Canal Street.

A New Orleans police commander whom none of the four could identify told the crowd that they could not stay there and later told them that buses were being brought to the Crescent City Connection, a nearby bridge to Jefferson Parish, to carry them to safety.

The crowd cheered and began to move. Suspicious, Mr. Bradshaw said that he asked the commander if he was sure that buses would be there for them. “We’d had so much misinformation by that point,” Mr. Bradshaw said.

“He looked all of us in the eye and said, ‘I swear to you, there are buses waiting across the bridge,’ ” Mr. Bradshaw said.

But on the bridge there were four police cruisers parked across some lanes. Between six and eight officers stood with shotguns in their hands, the witnesses said. As the crowd approached, the officers shot over the heads of the crowd, most of whom retreated immediately, Mr. Bradshaw, Ms. Slonsky and Ms. Golden and her son said.

Mr. Bradshaw said the officers were allowing cars to cross the bridge, some of them loaded with passengers. Only pedestrians were being stopped, he said. Chief Lawson said he believed that only emergency vehicles were allowed through.

Mr. Bradshaw said he approached the officers and begged to be allowed through, saying a commander in New Orleans had told them buses were waiting for them on the other side.

“He said that there are no buses and that there is no foot traffic allowed across the bridge,” Mr. Bradshaw said.

The remaining evacuees first sought refuge under a nearby highway overpass and then trudged back to New Orleans.”

Actually, there’s a lot more to it than that. According to their story in the Socialist Worker [warning: language], they “decided to build an encampment in the middle of the Ponchartrain Expressway–on the center divide, between the O’Keefe and Tchoupitoulas exits.” They thought this was a good place to watch for buses as well as be watched by the media and those who were supposed to be protecting the peace. They developed quite an encampment of survivors if their story is true (and there are aspects that are questionable- they claim not to have seen relief workers, but in a previous post here I liked to a photo essay by somebody who was also living in the French Quarter and he had pictures of relief efforts in the area], acquiring water, C-rations when a military truch spilled a couple of pallets, and more refugees. One of them had a radio, and they learned the media knew about them and was talking about them. Did the media offer to help? No, the media asked local law enforcement what it was going to do about those families, and local law enforcement stole their food and water and chased them off.

They say that “If the relief organizations had saturated the city with food and water in the first two or three days, the desperation, frustration and ugliness would not have set in.”

And, of course, that is just what the relief organizations were ready and prepared to do, it’s what they wanted to do. And that is exactly what Governor Blanco did not want them to do.

Note this (from comments at PoliPUndit: “Federal DHS National Response Plan, Emergency Support Function #6 – Mass Care, Housing, and Human Services:
“Under ESF #6, DHS and FEMA specifically name the American Red Cross as their “primary agency for mass care
…which coordinates the Federal mass care assistance in support of State and local mass care assistance.”

Blanco refused to cooperate with FEMA. And the media refuses to report the truth about that.

Posted in Hurricane Katrina | 3 Comments

That Sealed Exit from New Orleans…

From the New York Times comes more on this disturbing story of refugees refused permission to leave the city:

“Police officers refused to allow pedestrians to leave New Orleans, shot guns over their heads, and stole their food and water.

“The police kept saying, ‘We don’t want another Superdome,’ and ‘This isn’t New Orleans,’ ” said Larry Bradshaw, a San Francisco paramedic who was among those fleeing.

Arthur Lawson, chief of the Gretna, La., Police Department [DHM: a Democrat, in case anybody wonders], confirmed that his officers, along with those from the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office and the Crescent City Connection Police, sealed the bridge.

“There was no place for them to come on our side,” Mr. Lawson said.

He said that he had been asked by reporters about officers threatening victims with guns or shooting over their heads, but he said that he had not yet asked his officers about that.

“As soon as things calm down, we will do an inquiry and find out what happened,” he said.

…Officials in Lafayette, La., reported seeing scores of cruisers from the New Orleans police department in their city in the week after the hurricane. Some evacuees who fled to the Superdome and the convention center say that many police officers refused to patrol those structures after dark.

“It’s unbelievable what the police officers did; they just left us,” said Harold Veasey, a 66-year-old New Orleans resident who spent two horrific days at the convention center. And in the week after the hurricane, there were persistent rumors in and around New Orleans that police officers in suburban areas refused to help the storm victims.

Mr. Bradshaw and his partner, Lorrie Beth Slonsky, wrote an account about their experiences that has been widely circulated by e-mail and was first printed in The Socialist Worker.

Cathey Golden, a 51-year-old from Boston, and her 13-year-old son, Ramon Golden, yesterday confirmed the account.

The four met at the Hotel Monteleone in the French Quarter. Mr. Bradshaw and Ms. Slonsky had attended a convention for emergency medicine specialists. Ms. Golden and her two children, including 23-year-old Rashida Golden, were there to visit family.

The hotel allowed its guests and nearly 250 residents from the nearby neighborhood to stay until Thursday, Sept 1. With its food exhausted, the hotel’s manager finally instructed people to leave. Hotel staff handed out maps to show the way to the city’s convention center, to which thousands of other evacuees had fled.

A group of nearly 200 guests gathered to make their way to the center together, the four said. But on the way, they heard that the convention center had become a dangerous, unsanitary pit from which no one was being evacuated. So they stopped in front of a New Orleans police command post near the Harrah’s casino on Canal Street.

A New Orleans police commander whom none of the four could identify told the crowd that they could not stay there and later told them that buses were being brought to the Crescent City Connection, a nearby bridge to Jefferson Parish, to carry them to safety.

The crowd cheered and began to move. Suspicious, Mr. Bradshaw said that he asked the commander if he was sure that buses would be there for them. “We’d had so much misinformation by that point,” Mr. Bradshaw said.

“He looked all of us in the eye and said, ‘I swear to you, there are buses waiting across the bridge,’ ” Mr. Bradshaw said.

But on the bridge there were four police cruisers parked across some lanes. Between six and eight officers stood with shotguns in their hands, the witnesses said. As the crowd approached, the officers shot over the heads of the crowd, most of whom retreated immediately, Mr. Bradshaw, Ms. Slonsky and Ms. Golden and her son said.

Mr. Bradshaw said the officers were allowing cars to cross the bridge, some of them loaded with passengers. Only pedestrians were being stopped, he said. Chief Lawson said he believed that only emergency vehicles were allowed through.

Mr. Bradshaw said he approached the officers and begged to be allowed through, saying a commander in New Orleans had told them buses were waiting for them on the other side.

“He said that there are no buses and that there is no foot traffic allowed across the bridge,” Mr. Bradshaw said.

The remaining evacuees first sought refuge under a nearby highway overpass and then trudged back to New Orleans.”

Actually, there’s a lot more to it than that. According to their story in the Socialist Worker [warning: language], they “decided to build an encampment in the middle of the Ponchartrain Expressway–on the center divide, between the O’Keefe and Tchoupitoulas exits.” They thought this was a good place to watch for buses as well as be watched by the media and those who were supposed to be protecting the peace. They developed quite an encampment of survivors if their story is true (and there are aspects that are questionable- they claim not to have seen relief workers, but in a previous post here I liked to a photo essay by somebody who was also living in the French Quarter and he had pictures of relief efforts in the area], acquiring water, C-rations when a military truch spilled a couple of pallets, and more refugees. One of them had a radio, and they learned the media knew about them and was talking about them. Did the media offer to help? No, the media asked local law enforcement what it was going to do about those families, and local law enforcement stole their food and water and chased them off.

They say that “If the relief organizations had saturated the city with food and water in the first two or three days, the desperation, frustration and ugliness would not have set in.”

And, of course, that is just what the relief organizations were ready and prepared to do, it’s what they wanted to do. And that is exactly what Governor Blanco did not want them to do.

Note this (from comments at PoliPUndit: “Federal DHS National Response Plan, Emergency Support Function #6 – Mass Care, Housing, and Human Services:
“Under ESF #6, DHS and FEMA specifically name the American Red Cross as their “primary agency for mass care
…which coordinates the Federal mass care assistance in support of State and local mass care assistance.”

Blanco refused to cooperate with FEMA. And the media refuses to report the truth about that.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Catching up on Katrina- some good news.

Professor Bainbridge suggests somebody else to blame for the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Mudville linked to this slideshow by a French Quarter resident (UPDATE: Mudville has the new location- try this link for the slideshow). It’s long, but I think it’s really worth looking at. I’ve been practically obsessed by this story and I was astonished at what his pictures showed about:
The attitude of the citizens before, during, and after Hurricane
Conditions two days after Katrina (note: surprisingly good)
The looting *before* there was any flooding to speak of (surprisingly bad)
The arrival of military relief (immediate)
The evidence supporting President Bush’s comment that after the hurricane passed nobody expected the breaching of the levees.
The way the French Quarter resident got out of Dodge while thousands milled around the Convention Center waiting for the promised buses.
The presence of the media and their behavior.

The thousands of dead I’ve been hearing about (and repeating) may be a media exaggeration. Go figure. Note also that the media is furious that FEMA does not want to let them take pictures of any dead bodies. As I recall, the media made a deliberate decision not to show any more footage of 9/11 because it was ‘inflamatory.’

The Anchoress is on fire this morning- please read this post and note whose idea the Department of Homeland Security was and whose it was not.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Catching up on Katrina- some good news.

Professor Bainbridge suggests somebody else to blame for the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

Mudville linked to this slideshow by a French Quarter resident (UPDATE: Mudville has the new location- try this link for the slideshow). It’s long, but I think it’s really worth looking at. I’ve been practically obsessed by this story and I was astonished at what his pictures showed about:
The attitude of the citizens before, during, and after Hurricane
Conditions two days after Katrina (note: surprisingly good)
The looting *before* there was any flooding to speak of (surprisingly bad)
The arrival of military relief (immediate)
The evidence supporting President Bush’s comment that after the hurricane passed nobody expected the breaching of the levees.
The way the French Quarter resident got out of Dodge while thousands milled around the Convention Center waiting for the promised buses.
The presence of the media and their behavior.

The thousands of dead I’ve been hearing about (and repeating) may be a media exaggeration. Go figure. Note also that the media is furious that FEMA does not want to let them take pictures of any dead bodies. As I recall, the media made a deliberate decision not to show any more footage of 9/11 because it was ‘inflamatory.’

The Anchoress is on fire this morning- please read this post and note whose idea the Department of Homeland Security was and whose it was not.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment