Being Poor, Redux

I just discovered another, older blog post with the same title as our recent series on Being Poor. It’s a different approach, but still a valuable insight into the way the ‘other half’ live- and sometimes that ‘other half’ is the people in the pew next to yours, at the grocery store in front of you, and in your homeschool group.
Writer John Scalzi over at ‘Whatever,’ writes a long list of what being poor means. I agree with most of the things on his list, and certainly, this no nonsense list goes a long way toward explaining to those who have never experienced it just how limiting it is to be poor at times. Here’s a few I thought particularly brilliant and poignant- and I’ve experienced most of these, or something quite similar:

Being poor is hoping the toothache goes away.

Being poor is going to the restroom before you get in the school lunch line so your friends will be ahead of you and won’t hear you say “I get free lunch” when you get to the cashier. (DHM: I understand school lunch programs have changed now so this doesn’t happen)

Being poor is a heater in only one room of the house. (DHM: we’ve kept the heat so low that water froze in our bedroom at night, and we learned to sleep with wool caps on to maximize body heat- did you know that most of your body heat leaves through your head?)

Being poor is hoping your kids don’t have a growth spurt.

Being poor is feeling the glued soles tear off your supermarket shoes when you run around the playground.

Being poor is a bathtub you have to empty into the toilet. (DHM: or having to use a bucket because your sweet elderly Christian landlady won’t call a plumber on the weekend, and you can’t afford to make waves by complaining)

Being poor is the police busting into the apartment right next to yours. [DHM or being the one to call the police because while you were up late with a croupy baby you looked out your window and spotted a car theft in progress]

Being poor is needing that 35-cent raise.

Being poor is six dollars short on the utility bill and no way to close the gap.

Being poor is crying when you drop the mac and cheese on the floor.

Being poor is a six-hour wait in an emergency room with a sick child asleep on your lap.

Being poor is having to live with choices you didn’t know you made when you were 14 years old.

Being poor is a lumpy futon bed. (DHM: or the floor)

Being poor is people who have never been poor wondering why you choose to be so.

Being poor is knowing how hard it is to stop being poor.

Being poor is seeing how few options you have.

Being poor is running in place.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Every item on that list is something I can relate to, something true, something hard. But then there were some other things on the list I couldn’t relate to. I snipped them off. You can read them at the original if you like, but they are not necessarily family friendly. I can’t relate to them. Stealing from somebody else was never an option, no matter how poor we were. Trading immoral acts for bread was not even something we considered.

A third category of items on the list are things I don’t think are about being poor- they’re about being smart or stupid, or having an inappropriate sense of entitlement. Here’s what I mean:

Being poor is getting angry at your kids for asking for all the crap they see on TV.

You’ve got a t.v.? Man, sell it if you’re poor. Television is not a need, and your kids do need to learn not to ask for all the junk they see on television whether you’re poor or wealthy.

Being poor is knowing exactly how much everything costs.

That’s also being smart.

Being poor is coming back to the car with your children in the back seat, clutching that box of Raisin Bran you just bought and trying to think of a way to make the kids understand that the box has to last.

Buying Raisin Bran is not something poor people should be doing. Oatmeal, cornmeal mush, french toast, bread pudding- these things are all much cheaper than Raisin Bran and more filling, too. Nobody is ‘owed’ Raisin Bran, and if you’re poor, you need to be spending your small amount of money much more wisely than this.

Being poor is stopping the car to take a lamp from a stranger’s trash.
We still do this. This isn’t being poor, it’s being smart and frugal.

Being poor is off-brand toys.
Being poor is never buying anything someone else hasn’t bought first.
Being poor is picking the 10 cent ramen instead of the 12 cent ramen because that’s two extra packages for every dollar.

Each of these things are about being smart spenders, losing the sense of entitlement, and growing past your culture. Off-brand toys? Try used toys from a yard sale and home made play dough. IT’s smart to get two extra packages for every dollar. If you applied this mindset to everything you did, some day you just might not be poor anymore.

Being poor is knowing you really shouldn’t spend that buck on a Lotto ticket.
Being poor and stupid is buying it anyway. Being poor and smart is knowing better.

Being poor is making sure you don’t spill on the couch, just in case you have to give it back before the lease is up.

This is being poor and not too wise and a little bit unimaginative. Being poor and smart is doing without the couch or picking one up from the roadside, at a yard sale, or a thrift shop.
———————————————————————————-

All that said, I’d like to stress, again, that the hardest thing about being poor is that you have absolutely no margin for error, and human beings, rich and poor, are prone to error. Those with money in the bank, comfortable jobs, and good cars can make a foolish financial decision. They can blow a hundred dollars on new clothes or a new electronic toy, and it just means fewer lattes that month, or maybe not going to eat once or twice when you might otherwise.
When you’re poor, you use exactly the same level of thoughtlessness to spend a mere one dollar on a lotto ticket- and that might mean you don’t pay the electric bill and your power gets turned off, and then your milk goes bad, and then you need to spend more money for groceries, and that sets you back even further, and then, and then, and then…
It’s a rapid spiral down, but a grueling, hard climb back up.

In order to break free of that spiral you have to change your entire outlook about what is fair and what is not, what you deserve and what you do not. You have to change your attitude first so that you don’t see an unexpected ten dollars as permission to go to the movies, but rather as a chance to pay more on a bill, or put extra gas in the car, or buy ten dollars worth of an incredible sale item at the grocery store so that you can get ahead in the grocery bill later. You have to escape your cultural expectations, if you’re American in particular, about living standards and just how much consumerism is really necessary. The best tool for escaping poverty is the adjustment of your own point of view.

But you also have to have a few breaks- somebody fills up your tank without telling you, or drops off a bag of groceries anonymously, or leaves a twenty on your kitchen counter, or invites you over to dinner a few times, or buys diapers for the baby, or notices that your shoes have holes in them and so gives you a gift certificate to the shoe store, or somebody tells you how much she loves doing yard sales, but hates to go alone, so would you come with her (thus saving you gas)- a small break like these can help you pull ahead, providing you’ve adjusted your thinking so that you apply these breaks properly.

Bonnet Tip to BoardGameMadness for the link to Scalzi’s blog.



Updated: minor semantic adjustments
This post submitted to Mudville Gazette’s regular open post feature.

Updated to bring in links to the previous posts in this series:
Part one is here.
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Redux

Readers may also be interested in ‘Do Foodstamps Make You Fat?’
Or By An Ironic Coincidence, the first in a series of posts on emergency food preparation on a budget

Posted in frugalities, Who We Are | 11 Comments

Reading Lists

Over at The Corner they are talking about reading lists today. I love reading lists. They are also talking about ideas:

I enjoyed reading yeterday’s essay. Edifying and entertaining. But one quibble. In the piece you say that “[t]he Progressives revived what amounted to the medieval view of society as a living organism with the state — run by experts — as the new king.” Now, I thought the idea that society is a living organism was an idea favored by conservatives and that it stands in marked opposition to the liberal notion that society is a machine that can be tinkered with to achieve a desired result. Allow me to quote from an essay by Owen Harries, Editor in Chief of the National Interest from 1985-2001, that appeared in the November 13, 2003 issue of the American Conservative:

Society, for [Edumund] Burke, is neither a collection of loosely related individuals nor a mechanism with interchangeable parts. It is a living organism, and anything that affects the well being of any part of it will affect the whole. It is, therefore, he insists, “with infinite caution that any man ought to venture on pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purpose of society.”

It’s my impression that, at the level of theory, the notion that society is a living organism, or at least akin to one, is extremely important to conservative thought. Any thoughts?

Me: I’ve actually thought about this quite a bit. I’ve written a lot about how I agree with Burke and Hayek about the organic evolution of society. But the key difference is that the Progressives used Organicism (if that’s a word) in a different way, even if the rhetoric sometimes sounds the same. The Progressives used Darwinian theory to annoint the State. They made it into the brain of a single organism. In his Leaders of Men, Wilson at times talks about the people like they are easily manipulated set-pieces, of no consequence as individuals.

Many moons ago a family friend and I were having a rather heated discussion about a topic that tends to quickly run up temperatures. In this case, we’d talked about this before, so many times that I felt we were at cross purposes. I also was frustrated because we were coming to the discussion from such widely different points of view that we could hardly communicate about it because we had no shared reference points. Now I had read plenty of material from his point of view long before I’d ever even met him. But while he had read widely in the literature of books and articles that were highly critical of my point of view, he had never read anything representative of my point of view.

Finally, on this particular afternoon I said with more passion than tact, “Ooooh, I don’t know why we even keep talking about this. I’ve read your stuff but you haven’t read anything I recommend, and until you do, you’re just not going to understand where I’m coming from. Why won’t you read it?”
And he answered back with an equal supply of passion of tact, “Because your stuff all says the same thing.”
So then, of course, I asked him how he could possibly know that if he hadn’t read it.

He argued with me about the necessity of reading the same books. He said it shouldn’t matter what we had read, and he could see no need to read the stuff of the ‘other’ side in order to talk about it. We ended the discussion there – although not, by any means, the friendship, although it had a few rocky moments thanks to my lack of tact.

Years later, though, he brought it up again. He said that I was right- it was important to read at least some of the same books because that way you had some shared understanding of terminology and the description of a particular viewpoint would be a bit more generous from its supporters than from its detractors.
He said more, and I wish I could remember it more accurately, because he’s a really smart fellow and he always explains things better than I do.
The interesting thing is that I do not believe he ever really changed his mind about the initial issue. We never really talked about it again, but it seemed to me that while he modified some details, his basic beliefs about this mysterious topic which I am not divulging were still the same. However, by reading a few books representative of a view point he disagreed with, he had revised his views of those who espoused that idea more favorably. IT was a veddy good thing.

So I offer Jonah Goldberg’s list of ‘Conservative’ books to read. I agree with him in general, disagree on some specifics, and haven’t read all the books on his list. It’s a very useful tool. If somebody would like to offer links to a corresponding list of books which fairly represent leftist thought, I’d be glad to add it to this post.

Here’s Jonah’s article (you must scroll down past the snark about Mountain Dew being the redneck’s drink of choice to get to the meat of the article).

If you just go to NRO today and scroll down you’ll come across some other interesting posts about reading and conservative ideas. For those who haven’t time for that, here is one other book that deserves a mention:
Witness, by Whittaker Chambers (I don’t think of this as a conservative/liberal sort of book. IT’s a freedom vs totalitarian sort of books, and ought to be read and appreciated by everybody but communists, who, if they read and appreciate it, wouldn’t be communists).

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

A working defintion of immaturity might include those who excessively require others to tell them what things mean.

~ John Taylor Gatto, Underground History of American Education

Or, reversed: a working definition of maturity might include those who take the initiative to figure things out by themselves.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Always read the directions.

The Equuschick does. Otherwise, she would not have known that she is absolutely never to use her Wahl Horse Clipper set while bathing.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

961st Airborne Warning and Control Squadron (AWACS) Part II



Continued Memories from Okinawa ~ See Part I
See 961st AWACS

NCO Leadership School is now called Airman Leadership School as they have now combined two PMEs. It was at this PME that I learned the expression “Horror Floor”. In preparation for a possible difficult event I will mentally play out the Horror Floor. Which means “what it the worst thing” that could possibly happen? If I know that I am fine and have planned for this, then all other scenarios are a piece of cake! Rarely does the horror floor ever occur as we all know that our mind will worry about all sorts of things that will not happen!
It was also here that I got more confined on my feet. The marching and inspection process I had to lead in formation was a very good lesson. (It was also at this assignment that I tied a string around my finger to remind me to keep my head up while I walked ;-) )

Darwin Australia was really exciting , however to say that “I have been to Australia” would be the same as one spending two weeks in Long Beach, California boasting that they have seen America! I am not known to be shy, so I would ask strangers how to get to so and so, there response was normally, “I don’t know, I am not from here either”!

Tokyo was a day trip that I and some other GI’s took a train to while TDY at a Yakota AB. We walked all day long in this huge town, ate at a Mc Donalds, and hoped to find somewhere to buy some trinkets. When we finally headed to the train station to catch the last bus to the base, we noticed a flight of stairs going down to a large undergoing mall that we knew nothing about!

Oh, ya, all the friends we met there will be family for life!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Being Poor, Redux

I just discovered another, older blog post with the same title as our recent series on Being Poor. It’s a different approach, but still a valuable insight into the way the ‘other half’ live- and sometimes that ‘other half’ is the people in the pew next to yours, at the grocery store in front of you, and in your homeschool group.
Writer John Scalzi over at ‘Whatever,’ writes a long list of what being poor means. I agree with most of the things on his list, and certainly, this no nonsense list goes a long way toward explaining to those who have never experienced it just how limiting it is to be poor at times. Here’s a few I thought particularly brilliant and poignant- and I’ve experienced most of these, or something quite similar:

Being poor is hoping the toothache goes away.

Being poor is going to the restroom before you get in the school lunch line so your friends will be ahead of you and won’t hear you say “I get free lunch” when you get to the cashier. (DHM: I understand school lunch programs have changed now so this doesn’t happen)

Being poor is a heater in only one room of the house. (DHM: we’ve kept the heat so low that water froze in our bedroom at night, and we learned to sleep with wool caps on to maximize body heat- did you know that most of your body heat leaves through your head?)

Being poor is hoping your kids don’t have a growth spurt.

Being poor is feeling the glued soles tear off your supermarket shoes when you run around the playground.

Being poor is a bathtub you have to empty into the toilet. (DHM: or having to use a bucket because your sweet elderly Christian landlady won’t call a plumber on the weekend, and you can’t afford to make waves by complaining)

Being poor is the police busting into the apartment right next to yours. [DHM or being the one to call the police because while you were up late with a croupy baby you looked out your window and spotted a car theft in progress]

Being poor is needing that 35-cent raise.

Being poor is six dollars short on the utility bill and no way to close the gap.

Being poor is crying when you drop the mac and cheese on the floor.

Being poor is a six-hour wait in an emergency room with a sick child asleep on your lap.

Being poor is having to live with choices you didn’t know you made when you were 14 years old.

Being poor is a lumpy futon bed. (DHM: or the floor)

Being poor is people who have never been poor wondering why you choose to be so.

Being poor is knowing how hard it is to stop being poor.

Being poor is seeing how few options you have.

Being poor is running in place.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Every item on that list is something I can relate to, something true, something hard. But then there were some other things on the list I couldn’t relate to. I snipped them off. You can read them at the original if you like, but they are not necessarily family friendly. I can’t relate to them. Stealing from somebody else was never an option, no matter how poor we were. Trading immoral acts for bread was not even something we considered.

A third category of items on the list are things I don’t think are about being poor- they’re about being smart or stupid, or having an inappropriate sense of entitlement. Here’s what I mean:

Being poor is getting angry at your kids for asking for all the crap they see on TV.

You’ve got a t.v.? Man, sell it if you’re poor. Television is not a need, and your kids do need to learn not to ask for all the junk they see on television whether you’re poor or wealthy.

Being poor is knowing exactly how much everything costs.

That’s also being smart.

Being poor is coming back to the car with your children in the back seat, clutching that box of Raisin Bran you just bought and trying to think of a way to make the kids understand that the box has to last.

Buying Raisin Bran is not something poor people should be doing. Oatmeal, cornmeal mush, french toast, bread pudding- these things are all much cheaper than Raisin Bran and more filling, too. Nobody is ‘owed’ Raisin Bran, and if you’re poor, you need to be spending your small amount of money much more wisely than this.

Being poor is stopping the car to take a lamp from a stranger’s trash.
We still do this. This isn’t being poor, it’s being smart and frugal.

Being poor is off-brand toys.
Being poor is never buying anything someone else hasn’t bought first.
Being poor is picking the 10 cent ramen instead of the 12 cent ramen because that’s two extra packages for every dollar.

Each of these things are about being smart spenders, losing the sense of entitlement, and growing past your culture. Off-brand toys? Try used toys from a yard sale and home made play dough. IT’s smart to get two extra packages for every dollar. If you applied this mindset to everything you did, some day you just might not be poor anymore.

Being poor is knowing you really shouldn’t spend that buck on a Lotto ticket.
Being poor and stupid is buying it anyway. Being poor and smart is knowing better.

Being poor is making sure you don’t spill on the couch, just in case you have to give it back before the lease is up.

This is being poor and not too wise and a little bit unimaginative. Being poor and smart is doing without the couch or picking one up from the roadside, at a yard sale, or a thrift shop.
———————————————————————————-

All that said, I’d like to stress, again, that the hardest thing about being poor is that you have absolutely no margin for error, and human beings, rich and poor, are prone to error. Those with money in the bank, comfortable jobs, and good cars can make a foolish financial decision. They can blow a hundred dollars on new clothes or a new electronic toy, and it just means fewer lattes that month, or maybe not going to eat once or twice when you might otherwise.
When you’re poor, you use exactly the same level of thoughtlessness to spend a mere one dollar on a lotto ticket- and that might mean you don’t pay the electric bill and your power gets turned off, and then your milk goes bad, and then you need to spend more money for groceries, and that sets you back even further, and then, and then, and then…
It’s a rapid spiral down, but a grueling, hard climb back up.

In order to break free of that spiral you have to change your entire outlook about what is fair and what is not, what you deserve and what you do not. You have to change your attitude first so that you don’t see an unexpected ten dollars as permission to go to the movies, but rather as a chance to pay more on a bill, or put extra gas in the car, or buy ten dollars worth of an incredible sale item at the grocery store so that you can get ahead in the grocery bill later. You have to escape your cultural expectations, if you’re American in particular, about living standards and just how much consumerism is really necessary. The best tool for escaping poverty is the adjustment of your own point of view.

But you also have to have a few breaks- somebody fills up your tank without telling you, or drops off a bag of groceries anonymously, or leaves a twenty on your kitchen counter, or invites you over to dinner a few times, or buys diapers for the baby, or notices that your shoes have holes in them and so gives you a gift certificate to the shoe store, or somebody tells you how much she loves doing yard sales, but hates to go alone, so would you come with her (thus saving you gas)- a small break like these can help you pull ahead, providing you’ve adjusted your thinking so that you apply these breaks properly.

Bonnet Tip to BoardGameMadness for the link to Scalzi’s blog.



Updated: minor semantic adjustments
This post submitted to Mudville Gazette’s regular open post feature.

Updated to bring in links to the previous posts in this series:
Part one is here.
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Redux

Readers may also be interested in ‘Do Foodstamps Make You Fat?’
Or By An Ironic Coincidence, the first in a series of posts on emergency food preparation on a budget

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Reading Lists

Over at The Corner they are talking about reading lists today. I love reading lists. They are also talking about ideas:

I enjoyed reading yeterday’s essay. Edifying and entertaining. But one quibble. In the piece you say that “[t]he Progressives revived what amounted to the medieval view of society as a living organism with the state — run by experts — as the new king.” Now, I thought the idea that society is a living organism was an idea favored by conservatives and that it stands in marked opposition to the liberal notion that society is a machine that can be tinkered with to achieve a desired result. Allow me to quote from an essay by Owen Harries, Editor in Chief of the National Interest from 1985-2001, that appeared in the November 13, 2003 issue of the American Conservative:

Society, for [Edumund] Burke, is neither a collection of loosely related individuals nor a mechanism with interchangeable parts. It is a living organism, and anything that affects the well being of any part of it will affect the whole. It is, therefore, he insists, “with infinite caution that any man ought to venture on pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purpose of society.”

It’s my impression that, at the level of theory, the notion that society is a living organism, or at least akin to one, is extremely important to conservative thought. Any thoughts?

Me: I’ve actually thought about this quite a bit. I’ve written a lot about how I agree with Burke and Hayek about the organic evolution of society. But the key difference is that the Progressives used Organicism (if that’s a word) in a different way, even if the rhetoric sometimes sounds the same. The Progressives used Darwinian theory to annoint the State. They made it into the brain of a single organism. In his Leaders of Men, Wilson at times talks about the people like they are easily manipulated set-pieces, of no consequence as individuals.

Many moons ago a family friend and I were having a rather heated discussion about a topic that tends to quickly run up temperatures. In this case, we’d talked about this before, so many times that I felt we were at cross purposes. I also was frustrated because we were coming to the discussion from such widely different points of view that we could hardly communicate about it because we had no shared reference points. Now I had read plenty of material from his point of view long before I’d ever even met him. But while he had read widely in the literature of books and articles that were highly critical of my point of view, he had never read anything representative of my point of view.

Finally, on this particular afternoon I said with more passion than tact, “Ooooh, I don’t know why we even keep talking about this. I’ve read your stuff but you haven’t read anything I recommend, and until you do, you’re just not going to understand where I’m coming from. Why won’t you read it?”
And he answered back with an equal supply of passion of tact, “Because your stuff all says the same thing.”
So then, of course, I asked him how he could possibly know that if he hadn’t read it.

He argued with me about the necessity of reading the same books. He said it shouldn’t matter what we had read, and he could see no need to read the stuff of the ‘other’ side in order to talk about it. We ended the discussion there – although not, by any means, the friendship, although it had a few rocky moments thanks to my lack of tact.

Years later, though, he brought it up again. He said that I was right- it was important to read at least some of the same books because that way you had some shared understanding of terminology and the description of a particular viewpoint would be a bit more generous from its supporters than from its detractors.
He said more, and I wish I could remember it more accurately, because he’s a really smart fellow and he always explains things better than I do.
The interesting thing is that I do not believe he ever really changed his mind about the initial issue. We never really talked about it again, but it seemed to me that while he modified some details, his basic beliefs about this mysterious topic which I am not divulging were still the same. However, by reading a few books representative of a view point he disagreed with, he had revised his views of those who espoused that idea more favorably. IT was a veddy good thing.

So I offer Jonah Goldberg’s list of ‘Conservative’ books to read. I agree with him in general, disagree on some specifics, and haven’t read all the books on his list. It’s a very useful tool. If somebody would like to offer links to a corresponding list of books which fairly represent leftist thought, I’d be glad to add it to this post.

Here’s Jonah’s article (you must scroll down past the snark about Mountain Dew being the redneck’s drink of choice to get to the meat of the article).

If you just go to NRO today and scroll down you’ll come across some other interesting posts about reading and conservative ideas. For those who haven’t time for that, here is one other book that deserves a mention:
Witness, by Whittaker Chambers (I don’t think of this as a conservative/liberal sort of book. IT’s a freedom vs totalitarian sort of books, and ought to be read and appreciated by everybody but communists, who, if they read and appreciate it, wouldn’t be communists).

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

A working defintion of immaturity might include those who excessively require others to tell them what things mean.

~ John Taylor Gatto, Underground History of American Education

Or, reversed: a working definition of maturity might include those who take the initiative to figure things out by themselves.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

News and Views

Blogging will be rather light this morning as your friendly blogging hostess is feeling a bit blah. ‘Puny,’ as Granny Tea calls it.

Meanwhile, head over to Instapundit and note his post on Libby. I like this part, “On the question of what Libby was thinking — well, if the charges are true, it beats me. I actually had an email the other day from someone who used to practice law with him, and who expressed disbelief that a lawyer as smart and careful as Libby could get into this kind of trouble. Part of the problem, I think, is that working at the White House makes people stupid — between stress, sleep deprivation (which is no joke in that setting), constant flitting from crisis to crisis, and general bubble-ization, past a certain point people get effectively dumber the longer they stay. Is there more to it than that? Who knows. Fitzgerald didn’t make it sound like there’s a lot more here, but I suppose we’ll see.”

Word is (via the Instapundit again) that Alito is being considered for the Supreme Court nomination. Kopel at Volokh is reading tealeaves to see how Luttig and Alito might stand on second ammendment rights. If not tea leaves, former court rulings.

Powerline has a disturbing list of captured Iraqi Intelligence documents stored in a warehouse in Iraq. Why aren’t these documents and their contents getting more public attention?

Many of these documents, listed in a database known as HARMONY, have rather provocative titles:

Money Transfers from Iraq to Afghanistan
Secret Meeting with Taliban Group Member and Iraqi Government (Nov. 2000)

Iraqi Effort to Cooperate with Saudi Opposition Groups and Individuals

Order from Saddam to present $25,000 to Palestinian Suicide Bombers’ Families

IIS Reports from Embassy in Paris: Plan to Influence French Stance in UN Security Council

IIS Report on How French Campaigns are Financed

Improvised Explosive Devices Plan

Ricin research and improvement

There are thousands of similar documents. Many have already been authenticated and most are unclassified. That’s worth repeating: Most are unclassified.

NRO has some thoughts on LIbby with which I concur. Personally,I think he’s guilty, and I’ve thought so ever since I saw his strange letter to Judy Miller ‘releasing’ her from promises of confidentiality. That letter looked to me like he was trying to be cute and clever about writing a letter saying one thing, but meaning another. I think he’s guilty, and I think he should go to jail.
So I offer this next quote not by way of ‘But they did it, too,” but rather by way of pointing out certain media hypocrisies:

HEAVY BREATHING VS. DEEP SLEEP [Tim Graham]
One thing to note on the issue of media coverage of White House indictments. Not only did the media yawn when it came out that Robert Ray could have indicted Hillary for false statements in Travelgate, the media also yawned when the grand jury forewoman for Ken Starr, Freda Alexander, came out in March 1999 and told Washington CBS affiliate WUSA that she would have voted to indict President Clinton for perjury, if given the chance, and said the coverage of Starr was “grossly unfair.”

It’s a sharp contrast with more than a week of heavy breathing on Fitzgerald’s neck.

By way of further noting those interesting contrasts, The Political Teen also has some video footage of Bob Woodward (of Watergate fame) attempting to set the record straight on the key fact that Joe Wilson Lied. That is the point of origin of all this mess. Libby has no excuses, it sound like he was very stupid, and he will pay the necessary political price for his stupidity. I want that to happen. But I also want it to happen for people like Sandy Berger, thief and shredder of classified documents, and Joe Wilson, whose lies brought his wife and her role in his being sent to Niger in the public eye in the first place.

The U.N. and Iran, from Eye on the U.N.- 6 days before the Iranian president called for the annihilation of Israel (and also suggested ominously, that it was possible to imagine a world without the U.S. in it), this happened:

October 20, 2005 Iran introduced a resolution at the General Assembly called “the Global Agenda for Dialogue among Civilizations.” Congratulations all round as Iranian representative, Javad Zarif said:

“[T]he challenges faced today were multifaceted and old approaches based on power and exclusion had proven insufficient, and in most cases inappropriate. Such approaches had even led to the exacerbation of tension by widening the divide, marginalizing and alienating significant portions of the global population, and providing fertile ground for the spread of hatred and violence. [There was] the need for a new paradigm, based on the belief that each civilization had much to offer and that inclusion would bring with it mutual enrichment and benefit. The Global Agenda…was a milestone in the collective effort to elaborate that new paradigm.”

The resolution was adopted unanimously.

New Delhi: Three simultaneous explosions rock the city, at least thirty presumed dead (warning, the ads accompanying this site are not always child safe).
Update: The death toll here continues to rise. I’ve seen 41 cited here, and 58 cited elsewhere. Iaian Murphy at NRO notes that the explosiosn are timed to coincide with the peak shopping hours of the Hindu festival of lights, and Powerline notes that “Liberals often argue that the Islamists’ hatred of Christians is explained by policies of the American government, and, likewise, their hatred of Jews has its origins in Israel’s purported misdeeds. It is always worth remembering that they hate Hindus, too. The fact is, they hate pretty much everyone. It has nothing to do with us, and everything to do with them.”

Doctors are migrating from poor countries to wealthier countries, adn who can blame them really. This is a problem for those in the poor countries, of course. The Glittering Eye notes that this is one of the unintended consequences of nationalized health care- very interesting article.

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Updated to add more information on the murders in Delhi and to correct some bothersome spelling and typographical errors.

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News and Views

Blogging will be rather light this morning as your friendly blogging hostess is feeling a bit blah. ‘Puny,’ as Granny Tea calls it.

Meanwhile, head over to Instapundit and note his post on Libby. I like this part, “On the question of what Libby was thinking — well, if the charges are true, it beats me. I actually had an email the other day from someone who used to practice law with him, and who expressed disbelief that a lawyer as smart and careful as Libby could get into this kind of trouble. Part of the problem, I think, is that working at the White House makes people stupid — between stress, sleep deprivation (which is no joke in that setting), constant flitting from crisis to crisis, and general bubble-ization, past a certain point people get effectively dumber the longer they stay. Is there more to it than that? Who knows. Fitzgerald didn’t make it sound like there’s a lot more here, but I suppose we’ll see.”

Word is (via the Instapundit again) that Alito is being considered for the Supreme Court nomination. Kopel at Volokh is reading tealeaves to see how Luttig and Alito might stand on second ammendment rights. If not tea leaves, former court rulings.

Powerline has a disturbing list of captured Iraqi Intelligence documents stored in a warehouse in Iraq. Why aren’t these documents and their contents getting more public attention?

Many of these documents, listed in a database known as HARMONY, have rather provocative titles:

Money Transfers from Iraq to Afghanistan
Secret Meeting with Taliban Group Member and Iraqi Government (Nov. 2000)

Iraqi Effort to Cooperate with Saudi Opposition Groups and Individuals

Order from Saddam to present $25,000 to Palestinian Suicide Bombers’ Families

IIS Reports from Embassy in Paris: Plan to Influence French Stance in UN Security Council

IIS Report on How French Campaigns are Financed

Improvised Explosive Devices Plan

Ricin research and improvement

There are thousands of similar documents. Many have already been authenticated and most are unclassified. That’s worth repeating: Most are unclassified.

NRO has some thoughts on LIbby with which I concur. Personally,I think he’s guilty, and I’ve thought so ever since I saw his strange letter to Judy Miller ‘releasing’ her from promises of confidentiality. That letter looked to me like he was trying to be cute and clever about writing a letter saying one thing, but meaning another. I think he’s guilty, and I think he should go to jail.
So I offer this next quote not by way of ‘But they did it, too,” but rather by way of pointing out certain media hypocrisies:

HEAVY BREATHING VS. DEEP SLEEP [Tim Graham]
One thing to note on the issue of media coverage of White House indictments. Not only did the media yawn when it came out that Robert Ray could have indicted Hillary for false statements in Travelgate, the media also yawned when the grand jury forewoman for Ken Starr, Freda Alexander, came out in March 1999 and told Washington CBS affiliate WUSA that she would have voted to indict President Clinton for perjury, if given the chance, and said the coverage of Starr was “grossly unfair.”

It’s a sharp contrast with more than a week of heavy breathing on Fitzgerald’s neck.

By way of further noting those interesting contrasts, The Political Teen also has some video footage of Bob Woodward (of Watergate fame) attempting to set the record straight on the key fact that Joe Wilson Lied. That is the point of origin of all this mess. Libby has no excuses, it sound like he was very stupid, and he will pay the necessary political price for his stupidity. I want that to happen. But I also want it to happen for people like Sandy Berger, thief and shredder of classified documents, and Joe Wilson, whose lies brought his wife and her role in his being sent to Niger in the public eye in the first place.

The U.N. and Iran, from Eye on the U.N.- 6 days before the Iranian president called for the annihilation of Israel (and also suggested ominously, that it was possible to imagine a world without the U.S. in it), this happened:

October 20, 2005 Iran introduced a resolution at the General Assembly called “the Global Agenda for Dialogue among Civilizations.” Congratulations all round as Iranian representative, Javad Zarif said:

“[T]he challenges faced today were multifaceted and old approaches based on power and exclusion had proven insufficient, and in most cases inappropriate. Such approaches had even led to the exacerbation of tension by widening the divide, marginalizing and alienating significant portions of the global population, and providing fertile ground for the spread of hatred and violence. [There was] the need for a new paradigm, based on the belief that each civilization had much to offer and that inclusion would bring with it mutual enrichment and benefit. The Global Agenda…was a milestone in the collective effort to elaborate that new paradigm.”

The resolution was adopted unanimously.

New Delhi: Three simultaneous explosions rock the city, at least thirty presumed dead (warning, the ads accompanying this site are not always child safe).
Update: The death toll here continues to rise. I’ve seen 41 cited here, and 58 cited elsewhere. Iaian Murphy at NRO notes that the explosiosn are timed to coincide with the peak shopping hours of the Hindu festival of lights, and Powerline notes that “Liberals often argue that the Islamists’ hatred of Christians is explained by policies of the American government, and, likewise, their hatred of Jews has its origins in Israel’s purported misdeeds. It is always worth remembering that they hate Hindus, too. The fact is, they hate pretty much everyone. It has nothing to do with us, and everything to do with them.”

Doctors are migrating from poor countries to wealthier countries, adn who can blame them really. This is a problem for those in the poor countries, of course. The Glittering Eye notes that this is one of the unintended consequences of nationalized health care- very interesting article.

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Updated to add more information on the murders in Delhi and to correct some bothersome spelling and typographical errors.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment