Pickled Eggs

According to the Georgia Egg Commission, the following method of hard-cooking facilitates peeling of ultra fresh eggs.  Make a pinhole in the large end of the egg, place the eggs in a single layer in a saucepan, and cover with cold water to an inch above the layer of eggs.  Place a lid on the pan and bring eggs to a boil.  Remove the pan of eggs from the burner, leaving the cover in place, and allow to sit for 15-18 minutes, adjusting time up or down 3 minutes for larger or smaller eggs.  Immediately remove eggs from the pan of hot water with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice water for one minute.  In the meantime, bring hot water to simmering.  After one minute in ice water remove eggs back to the simmering water for ten seconds.  The ten second interval is important because this allows the shell to expand without expanding the rest of the egg.  Peel immediately by cracking the shells of the egg all over.  Roll each egg gently between hands to loosen the shell.  Peel, starting at the large end of the egg.  The peeling may take place under cold running water to help wash the shell off the egg and to minimize the shell breaking into the white.
Another cooking method when you are less concerned about peeling of ultra-fresh eggs is to make a pinhole in the large end of the egg, place the eggs in a single layer in a saucepan, and cover with cold water to an inch above the layer of eggs.  Place a lid on the pan and bring eggs to a boil.  Turn down the heat and simmer for 15 minutes.  Place the eggs in cold water and when cool, remove shells.  Crack the shell of the egg all over.  Peel, starting at the large end of the egg.  The peeling may take place under cold running water to help wash the shell off the egg.

MOre here, including recipes.

Essentially, you need a sterile quart jar, a dozen eggs, and your vinegar and brine solution.  Bring the solution to a boil, simmer five minutes, pour over the boiled eggs in the quart jar. Put a lid on the jar and store in the fridge for a week to four weeks before eating (the larger the egg, the longer the time).

Eggs have not always been pickled in the fridge, but there is at least one case of botulism in home pickled eggs stored at room temperature. I’m inclined to think it’s because that batch was sometimes exposed to sunlight.  My husband used to store our jars of pickling eggs in the cool, dark of our 100 year old cellar (Yes, I know that’s a very young cellar if you’re a Brit.)

A really simple version is to save the pickling liquid from your other pickles, and pour it over hardboiled eggs in a jar, then store in the fridge.

Or you can do this:
Combine 1/2 cup sea salt with 2 cups water- heat and stir until salt is dissolved. Chill. Pour brine over hardboiled eggs in a quart sized jar. Store in fridge for two days.
Heat up 1 quart of vinegar, 1/4 cup of pickling spices, 2 cloves of garlic, and 1 Tablespoon of sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved.  Add extra cloves or a dried hot pepper if you like.  Add some sliced beets to give the eggs a pink color, if that floats your boat.
Drain the brine from the eggs, and pour the new vinegar pickling mixture over them. Store in fridge two more weeks.

From Carla Emery’s Encyclopedia of Country Living,

Or make this British Pub style:

Combine in saucepan:

Four cups Malt Vinegar

1 tsp Chili Peppers (to taste, so perhaps more or less)

12 whole peppercorns

12 whole cloves

3 Frontier Cinnamon Sticks 2 3/4, 16 Ounce Bags (Pack of 2)

2 tsp Whole Allspice, ground and then measured

Bring to boil, then simmer for ten minutes.

Cool, strain.

Pour over boiled and peeled eggs in a quart sized jar.  Cover and store in fridge for two weeks before eating.

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