Copywork phrases

SAYINGS, WISE AND OTHERWISE.
Anger punishes Itself.
All is not lost that Is in peril.
Blind men’s wives need no paint.
As is the workman, so is the work.
Abundance, like want, ruins many.
Use pastime so as not to lose time.
Trip broth is better than no porridge. (I have no idea what this means)
Try the ice before you venture upon it.
Better cut the shoe than pinch the foot.
As long lives the merry life as the sad.
A good word is as soon said as a bad one.
An old cat laps as much as a young kitten.
Better one word in time than two afterwards.
Two fools in a house are too many by a couple.
Better fare hard with good men than feast with bad.
Affairs that are done by due degree are soon ended. (I’m not sure what this one means, either)
Better go to Heaven in rags than to hell in embroidery.
An angry man opens his mouth and shuts his eyes.—Cato.
He merits no thanks that does a kindness for his own end.
He that is needy when be is married, shall be rich when he is buried.
He that is poor all his kindred scorn him; he that is rich all are kin to him.
An ape’s an ape; a varlet’s a varlet, though they be clad in silk or scarlet.

From an 1898 Good Housekeeping

To use for copywork for an older child- year 4 or so, I would think, copy and paste to a word document, doublespace them, adjust the font to suit you and print them out. Let a smaller child get some practie with scissors in by cutting them into strips. Put them in a jar or other container and occasionally let your student pull one out to use for copywork.
Most of the time copywork should come from the books the students are reading, and the children should choose the passage to copy themselves.* But occasionally it’s nice to take a break from the work of choosing, to pick something with a touch of novelty. One of these might prompt some interesting discussions.

*(At other times when you have noticed your student is rather lax about apostrophes or capitalizing proper names or some other mechanics of grammar issue, you would choose copywork from their reading which includes examples of the little point you want your student to notice.)

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school shootings and gun stats

It feels bad, but it’s hard to get a clear picture when there is so much lying about the numbers. Another claim, 22 school shootings, counts an incident with a BB gun, an accidental discharge in a gun safety class, domestic violence in an apartment on a campus, domestic violence in a dorm room on a university campus, a suicide in a school parking lot at night when nobody else was there- and arguably, that is *not* what most of us are thinking about or talking about when we call something a school shooting. We’re talking about school children in school being targeted by a crazed shooter who wants to kill a lot of kids.

And we aren’t allowed to investigate fully any of the factors- is it related to single parent households? Mental illness? Specific medications- those are questions nobody wants askd, they are dismissed instantly, with hostility rather than reason.

What about the attention factor- how much of a role does the media play in this, when they repeatedly feed on the shooters’ desire for publicity by publishing the name and photographs of the shooters, splashing them with pseudo-glory all over the media? And how much of our fear is not because things are really that much worse, but because with social media and the internet we receive, and search out for ourselves, a constant stream of information on them. Before the internet, we weren’t flooded with a deluge of information and details and speculation.

One school shooting is one too many. But if we’re going to change the Constitution, limit the Constitutionally protected rights of millions of law-abiding citizens, we shouldn’t do that based on lies, misinformation, misunderstandings, and emotional reactions which may not even actually address the real issues.It feels bad, but it’s hard to get a clear picture when there is so much lying about the numbers. Another claim, 22 school shootings, counts an incident with a BB gun, an accidental discharge in a gun safety class, domestic violence in an apartment on a campus, domestic violence in a dorm room on a university campus, a suicide in a school parking lot at night when nobody else waIt feels bad, but it’s hard to get a clear picture when there is so much lying about the numbers. Another claim, 22 school shootings, counts an incident with a BB gun, an accidental discharge in a gun safety class, domestic violence in an apartment on a campus, domestic violence in a dorm room on a university campus, a suicide in a school parking lot at night when nobody else was there- and arguably, that is *not* what most of us are thinking about or talking about when we call something a school shooting. We’re talking about school children in school being targeted by a crazed shooter who wants to kill a lot of kids.

And we aren’t allowed to investigate fully any of the factors- is it related to single parent households? Mental illness? Specific medications- those are questions nobody wants askd, they are dismissed instantly, with hostility rather than reason.

What about the attention factor- how much of a role does the media play in this, when they repeatedly feed on the shooters’ desire for publicity by publishing the name and photographs of the shooters, splashing them with pseudo-glory all over the media? And how much of our fear is not because things are really that much worse, but because with social media and the internet we receive, and search out for ourselves, a constant stream of information on them. Before the internet, we weren’t flooded with a deluge of information and details and speculation.

One school shooting is one too many. But if we’re going to change the Constitution, limit the Constitutionally protected rights of millions of law-abiding citizens, we shouldn’t do that based on lies, misinformation, misunderstandings, and emotional reactions which may not even actually address the real issues.s there- and arguably, that is *not* what most of us are thinking about or talking about when we call something a school shooting. We’re talking about school children in school being targeted by a crazed shooter who wants to kill a lot of kids.

And we aren’t allowed to investigate fully any of the factors- is it related to single parent households? Mental illness? Specific medications- those are questions nobody wants askd, they are dismissed instantly, with hostility rather than reason.

What about the attention factor- how much of a role does the media play in this, when they repeatedly feed on the shooters’ desire for publicity by publishing the name and photographs of the shooters, splashing them with pseudo-glory all over the media? And how much of our fear is not because things are really that much worse, but because with social media and the internet we receive, and search out for ourselves, a constant stream of information on them. Before the internet, we weren’t flooded with a deluge of information and details and speculation.

One school shooting is one too many. But if we’re going to change the Constitution, limit the Constitutionally protected rights of millions of law-abiding citizens, we shouldn’t do that based on lies, misinformation, misunderstandings, and emotional reactions which may not even actually address the real issues, which we cannot even discover when people are more interested in pumping up numbers and calling people who disagree with them callous murderers who don’t care about dead kids.

More here: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/05/21/school-shootings-santa-fe-texas-columbine-stoneman-douglas-parkland-column/627183002/

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Calves Feet Jelly

“FRESH CALVES FEET JELLY.
Scald, take off the hair, and wash very clean four feet ; put them into a saucepan with two quarts of cold water, and when it comes to a boil let them simmer for six or seven hours; take out the feet, and strain the liquor into a deep dish. The following day remove the fat carefully from the top, and give it another boil, which will reduce it to one quart of stiff stock or jelly.—This may be flavored as you like ; it must be dissolved and boiled again when seasoned. It is very delicate and nourishing for an invalid.”

You may remember Pollyanna delivering Calves’ foot jelly to Mrs. Snow.


1869, The Kitchen companion, containing valuable recipes for ice creams, puddings, pies, cakes, blanc mange, custards, &c., &c., being an excellent guide to the housewife

Wizard in the Tree by Lloyd Alexander also has a reference:

“Ah, yes, it would be better to save our business for a happier moment. These distressful events have put a strain on all of us. I can see you’re not quite yourself. A good night’s sleep will work wonders. Tomorrow, I’ll bring you a pot of my calves’foot jelly, that has always been very curative.” Mrs. Parsel would have made her way to the door. but Scrupnor stepped in front of her. “‘That’s thoughtful of you, Mrs. P., but unnecessary. Calves’-foot jelly. Ah, if only our cares and concerns could be lightened with a little calves’-foot jelly, the world would be a happier place.”

This is immediately prior to Scrupnor imprisoning Mrs. Parsel in his counting room for safe keeping while he works out the details of his plan dastardly play of untimely deaths  for Mrs. P, Arbican the wizard, and Mallory.

It’s recommended in most 19th century cookbooks as nourishing for invalids and delightful to children when sweetened with dried fruits, lemon juice and sugar.

There is a version popular in Jewish cookery which has boiled eggs and meat suspended in the gelatin, rather than being a clear gelatin. Those don’t look appetizing to me at all, but I think I’d be willing to taste any of them. I don’t think I could bring myself to prepare a batch, though.

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Cherry Layer Cake, vintage receipt

From Miss A Nichols Allegan, Mich

Cherry Layer Cake

2 cups of flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 tablespoon butter

pinch of salt

1 cup canned cherries without the juice [reserve juice for frosting]

2 eggs

2/3 cup water

Bake in layers

Icing: 1 cup sugar

1/2 cup water cup

1/2 cup cherry juice

boil until it strings and then stir until it grains fine

Put between the cakes.

 

I think I will try this recipe with mango instead of cherries. I’ll just frost it with a dusting of powdered sugar or whipped cream.

 

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The Trouble With the Irish Help

I am aware that it is the fashion with many ladies to disparage Irish domestics, to call them stupid, ignorant, imprudent, ungrateful, the plagues of housekeeping.

That they are ignorant is true enough ; it does require skill, patience, and judgment, to teach a raw Irish girl how to perform the work in a gentleman’s family ; but they are neither stupid nor ungrateful, and if they are taught in the right manner, they prove very capable, and are most faithful and affectionate domestics.

A friend of mine, who is just what a woman ought to be, capable of directing—even doing if necessary, in the kitchen as well as shining in the drawing room, hired one of these poor despised Irish girls, new from the land of the Shamrock, who only understood the way of doing work in a hovel, yet, like all her class, she told the lady ” sure she could do any thing she wanted.” The lady, however, did not trust the girl to make any experiments, but went to the kitchen with her and taught her, or rather did the work herself, and allowed the help to look on and learn by example, which for such is much more effectual than lectures.

When the dinner was nearly ready, the lady retired to dress, telling Julia to watch the roast, and she would return soon and show her how to prepare it for the table. We may imagine with what utter bewilderment the poor girl had been overwhelmed during this, he first lesson in civilized life. The names of the articles of furniture used in the kitchen as well as their uses, were entirely unknown to her ; and she had seen so many new things done, which she was expected to remember, that it must have made her heart-sick to reflect how much she had to learn.

But there was one thing she thought she understood, that was to cook potatoes. These were done, and she would show the lady she knew how to prepare them for the table. When the lady returned, she found the girl seated in the middle of the floor, the potatoes in her lap, while she, with a very satisfied look, was peeling them with her fingers ! Are there not ladies who would have exclaimed—” Oh, the stupid, ignorant, dirty creature ! She cannot be taught to do my work. I must send her away !” And away she would have been sent, irritated if not discouraged, and perhaps without knowing a place where to lay down her head in this strange country. My friend did not act in this manner—she expressed no surprise at the attitude of the girl, only quietly said—” That is not the best way to peel your potatoes, Julia—just lay them on this plate, and I will show you how I like to have them done.”

That Irish girl remained a servant in the same family for five years, proved herself not only capable of learning to work, but willing and most devoted in the service of her mistress, whom she regarded with a reverence little short of what a Catholic feels for his patron saint.

And thus, if with patience and kindness these poor Irish girls are treated and taught, may good and faithful help be obtained. But unless ladies know how the work should be done and and are willing to teach their domestics, they should not employ the Irish when they first arrive. Those who do employ and carefully instruct this class of persons, perform a most benevolent act to the usually destitute exiles, and also a good service to the community, by rendering those who would, if ignorant, become a burden and a nuisance, useful and often respectable members of society. To educate a good domestic is one of the surest proofs that a lady is a good housekeeper.

 

The Good Housekeeper, Or the Way to Live Well, and to be Well While We Live …
By Sarah Josepha Buell Hale

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