Ancient Historians by Michael Grant, Reading Schedule

These are not lesson plans, but rather a very loosely organized reading schedule. I would spend at least a week on each assigned reading- reading a few pages a day. Two weeks is probably better. If you take a week per assignment, you’ll be done in 24 weeks or so, but very likely your student will be burned out. If you take two weeks, you’ll get through it in under a year. Those estimates are assuming a consistant pace of one or two weeks through each numbered reading assignment, but they are not all equal. One section might have a student reading 20 pages, and another only 10, so you may want to vary the length of time you give for readings as well.

I did not assign the entire book. As I recall, the first two thirs are more about specific historians and their writings, and the last section is biographical or literary criticism and more polemic in nature. But it’s been a long time, and the book is in the states and I am here in the Philippines cleaning out old computer files in a very piecemeal fashion.

Reading, narrating, and some timeline work is the basic plan. You might also choose one of these narrations for your student o rewrite in more detail, fleshing it out into an article of his own. You could vary the narration styles, asking for a chapter outline, a list of details, a written test the student devises for you to take, but the reading, narrating, and timeline are going to be the most important parts.

I would assign this to students probably 16 and up, although advanced students might begin at 15. If you wanted to list it in a transcript, it could be Ancient History, obviously. If you beef up some of the writing assignments it could be a literature or writing course as well.

Here’s how Barnes and Nobles describes the book:
If Greece and Rome are held to be the cradles of Western civilization, this is in part due to the fact that they are the cradles of written history. Between 500 B.C. and 500 A.D. men such as Herodotus, Thucydides and Tacitus virtually invented the discipline of history as we know it. To these men history was a dual art

the art of recording the truth as accurately as possible and the art of writing as lucidly as the great men of letters.

This text offers an examination of the primary chroniclers of the ancient world. Beginning with Herodotus and Thucydides and their very different approaches to narration, the book discusses the works and methods of the founders of the historical discipline.

THe Ancient Historians, by Michael Grant

  1. Intro, Before Herodotus, pages 3-22
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  2. Herodotus:- The Life and Work of, 23-37
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  3. Herodotus: The background and Beliefs of, 38-56
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  4. Herodotus: Methods of, 57-69
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  5. Part 2. Thucydides: Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War, 69-87
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  6. Speeches and personalities in, 88-101
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  7. Power and Politics in, 102-113
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  8. Methods of, 114-124
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  9. Part 3, The Later Greeks: Xenophon, 125-136  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  10. The dramatic historians, 136-141
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  11. Polybius, 144-167
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  12. Part 4 latin writers of the republic: Cato the censor and after, 167-180  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  13. Caesar, 181-194
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  14. Sallust, 195-216
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  15. Part 5, the two faces of empire: Llivy, 217-242  Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  16. Josephus, 243-270
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  17. Part 6 Tacitus
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  18. Tacitus and the empire,, 271
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  19. Anarchy and humanity in Tacitus, 300
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  20. Part 7, greek and latin biographers: Plutarch, 309-328: Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  21. Suetonius, 329
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  22. Part 8 christian and pagan: Eusebius, 343, Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
  23. Ammianus, 358
    Narrate, orally or in writing. Once a week choose at least one person or event from this book to add to your timeline or century book.
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